bioregionalism


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bioregionalism

[‚bī·ō′rē·jən·əl‚iz·əm]
(ecology)
An environmentalist movement to make political boundaries coincide with bioregions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Doyle's drafts for Covered Bridge suggest a subtle movement away from the dichotomy between "healthy" rural bioregionalism and urban anthropocentric hubris articulated in his unpublished early writings ("Untitled Prose Meditation").
22) Michael Vincent McGinnnis, Bioregionalism (New York: Routledge Press, 1998); Pramod Parajuli, "Revisiting Gandhi and Zapata: Motion of Global Capital, Geographies of Difference and the Formation of Ecological Ethnicities," in In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and GlobalizationLife Projects and Globalization, ed.
Veteto (Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of North Texas), "Environmental Anthropology Engaging Ecotopia: Bioregionalism, Permaculture, and Ecovillages" is a 320 page compendium comprising sixteen thematically erudite and scholarly articles.
We delved deeply into community sustainability and bioregionalism.
2009), there is an environmental justice strand within bioregionalism that speaks eloquently to the other ways of knowing our place.
Environmental anthropology engaging ecotopia; bioregionalism, permaculture, and ecovillages.
It means the bioregionalism of a place: knowing the species names, their personalities, what they're able to do in their life, and how they interact with humans.
In striking contrast to OMA's visions of grandeur, Norman's low-tech "counter 'master plan'" joined organic agriculture and practices such as rainwater harvesting, forest gardening, and composting to craft his model of eco-communalism and bioregionalism, realized in collaboration with a local group of per-maculture activists.
4) My thanks to Susan Knutson for telling me about bioregionalism, which recognizes the impact of geographic or environmental factors and socio-cultural issues, as well as the connections between similar bioregions that are geographically separated.
Lysaght's gift for bringing natural science and lyric poetry into free play links him not only to Richard Murphy, but also to Michael Longley, Eamon Grennan, and finally, to Moya Cannon, whose own scientific understanding of nature and devotion to the burren region of western Ireland are characteristic of bioregionalism, with its emphasis on the necessity of a relationship to a particular place in arriving at true respect for nature.
For Ward Kropotkin's ideas are relevant to an era hypnotized by the 'cult of bigness', and he notes too how Kropotkin's suggestions on a decentralized economy and bioregionalism, link his earlier key influences - Ebenezer Howard, Patrick Geddes, Lewis Mumford and Paul Goodman (Kropotkin 1985: 159 - 165) - to the writers of the 1970s and 1980s, Schumacher (1974) and Kirkpatrick Sale (1985), regarding intermediate, 'human-scale' technology and bioregionalism, and of course the radical agriculture and social ecology of Bookchin (1982) and the organic farming advocated by Wendell Berry (1977).