bioregionalism

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bioregionalism

[‚bī·ō′rē·jən·əl‚iz·əm]
(ecology)
An environmentalist movement to make political boundaries coincide with bioregions.
References in periodicals archive ?
might be called a "bioregionalist aesthetic." The states that
People who are unsure of their home area's resources, geography, history, problems, and possibilities are very much out of touch with reality, bioregionalists say.
Affinity with bioregionalist themes is recognized in green syndicalist appeals for a replacement of nation-states with bioregional communities.
Bioregionalist Stephanie Mills (1995), for example, writes of "our species beginning finally to take an interest in attending to what the land itself has wanted to bring forth, its creation of self-regulating communities of organisms, climax ecosystems" (3).
We simply are not in, nor about to be in, a world that resembles the bioregionalist dream of a small human population, most folks happily living simple lives in the country and leaving nature alone.
As a bioregionalist and author of In Service of the Wild and Reinhabiting Damaged Land as well as Epicurean Simplicity Mills draws on her extensive experience in connecting humanity to nature to create a work that's both personal and political.
Further, the bioregionalist movement to re-inhabit cities-restoring urban habitat systems, supporting local sustainable production and trade networks, funding mass transit, recycling and reuse, etc.-is really just an argument for becoming Native to place.
The governmental structures have been reorganised to relate better to regional ecological systems, in accordance with the bioregionalist understanding of how human beings belong to the part of the earth they inhabit.(1) It does not seem to be an Ecotopian goal to do without politics, but much has been achieved in the way of making politics a less formal and specialised activity.
While Buchanan's tribalism may not blend well with multiculturalism or gay rights, his isolationist ideals are consistent with the far green's "bioregionalist" vision of local self-sufficiency.
(150) Cannon, supra note 144, at 281; see also Parsons, supra note 144, at 3 (discussing bioregionalist views, including distrust of central authority).
Bioregionalist ecocritic Tom Lynch uses the word to indicate an embrace of deserts their biotic elements and their inhabitants.