melanocyte-stimulating hormone

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melanocyte-stimulating hormone

[mə′lan·ə‚sīt ¦stim·yə‚lād·iŋ ′hȯr‚mōn]
(biochemistry)
A protein substance secreted by the intermediate lobe of the pituitary of humans which causes dispersion of pigment granules in the skin; similar to intermedins in other vertebrates. Abbreviated MSH. Also known as melanophore-dilating principle; melanophore hormone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The increase in the yield recorded in this investigation could be a reflection of the effect of bioregulators on growth and development, it might be due to (a) increase in the number of branches per plant, which gave a chance to the plant to carry more flowers, pods and hence more seeds (b) increase in the photosynthetic pigments content, which could lead to increase in photosynthesis, resulting in greater transfer of assimilates to the seeds and causing increase in their weight (Table 3).
Despite numerous studies on thiourea acting as effective bioregulator imparting resistance to crop plants against abiotic stresses (Srivastava et al.
SA is responsible for aspirin's renowned effects in relieving pain and inflammation, and, according to the new study, it may be the first in a new class of bioregulators.
Since seeds' treatment has been increasingly used and the level of seeds' vigor may interfere with the action of regulators present in the Stimulate[R] of stored corn seeds, the objective of this present study was to assess the effects of the bioregulator Stimulate[R] about seed treatment on physiological quality of maize seeds in different periods of storage.
Bioregulators and biostimulants have been widely studied in crops of great economic importance, such as cotton, soybean, corn and bean (Lima et al.
Abscission and thinning of young fruit and their regulation by plant hormones and bioregulators.
The complement system is a set of enzymes and bioregulators with multiple biological activities, playing a key role in both innate (alternative and lectin pathway) and acquired (classical pathway) immunity.
Stimulation effect of some bioregulators on flowering, chemical constituents, essential oil and phytohormones of tuberose (Polianthes tuberos L.
1]) was not sufficient to ensure adequate availability of dissolved oxygen in the proposed production system, resulting in anaerobic conditions in the early hours every day in both treatments, thus severely limiting the efficiency of probiotic bioregulators in the closed system using recirculated water.
Chemical products have been used for fruit fly control, although there have been efforts to develop an integrated pest management programme using biological control agents (Destefano et al, 2005); control has also been attempted with bioregulators, such as gibberellic acid (Greany et al.
Chemical synthesis of hormones, pheromones, and other bioregulators.