bioscience

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bioscience

[¦bī·ō¦sī·əns]
(biology)
The study of the nature, behavior, and uses of living organisms as applied to biology.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bioscientists based at the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation have discovered that DNA in cancerridden cells becomes damaged much earlier than previously thought.
Cory Funk is a bioscientist with a doctoral degree from the University of Illinois, where he studied the role of estrogens as a master regulator of gene expression in breast cancer.
Stefan Moisyadi, a veteran bioscientist at UH medical school's Institute for Biogenesis Research (IBR), said in the statement.
Alice Mauchline is a research fellow and bioscientist at the University of Reading who combines her interests in biodiversity and sustainability with pedagogic research focused on improving the student fieldwork experience.
Dr Campbell Tang, pictured right, Principal Bioscientist at CPI and Technical Lead for Marine IB, said: "There is an increasing trend of exploiting the richness of the ocean to replace petrochemicals and fossil fuels.
The long-running debate in journals and in the media between economist Julian Simon of Harvard University and bioscientist Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University included wagers over evidences supporting their convictions.
Despite the vital importance of the emerging area of biotechnology and its role in defense planning and policymaking, no definitive book has been written on the topic for the defense policymaker, the military student, and the private-sector bioscientist interested in the "emerging opportunities market" of national security.
Professor Bruce Caterson, a bioscientist at Cardiff University, says: 'In health terms, there has been a change in attitudes and I believe we will see these changes really take off in 2004.
Also receiving honorary degrees in July are renowned bioscientist Sir Paul Nurse, director general of the new Crick Institute and president of the Royal Society, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, who will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree for his contribution to advances in cancer research and cell biology.
Bioscientist and novelist Sunetra Gupta, Rolls-Royce engineering director Liz Watson and Sarah Baillie, who invented a model of a cow's rear end to help veterinary students, will talk about their work at Aston University.
Placed ninth in a list that includes the likes of Watson and Crick's ground-breaking DNA work and the birth of the first working computer, one fellow bioscientist last night predicted Evans' findings would be even higher up the list in years to come.