biosocial


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biosocial

[‚bī·ō′sō·shəl]
(zoology)
Pertaining to the interplay of biological and social influences.
References in periodicals archive ?
Family biosocial variables have also been documented to affect the psychological and physical constructs of individuals with depressive mental disorder in Nigeria [20],[21],[22] and other parts of the world.
Thus, the present study aimed to compare the biosocial and academic profile and the stress level of first-and fourth-year students of the undergraduate nursing course at a public university in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
This study is framed by theories of social identity and biosocial constructs.
Through a variety of case studies drawn from around the world, from HIV to malaria and from Lyme disease to tuberculosis, the book emphasizes a biosocial or biocultural approach to the understanding of infectious disease.
Los hallazgos nacionales muestran con mayor frecuencia experiencias para las areas de bienestar social (comunidad) e inclusion sociolaboral, seguidas de psicosocial (salud mental), educacion y biosocial (rehabilitacion).
Deja una vasta produccion que abarca 30 libros publicados y 200 articulos de investigacion cientifica, ademas de haber hecho un aporte original a la psicologia con su teoria del aprendizaje biosocial.
Gender and health: Relational, intersectional, and biosocial approaches.
Modelo biosocial, dominante desde el siglo XVII hasta la primera mitad del siglo XX, que considera a la discapacidad como un problema biologico e inherente a la persona.
But in a biosocial contract, the players include all of the stakeholders in the political community and substantive fairness is the focus.
Entry into motherhood among adolescent girls in two informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya," Journal of Biosocial
In short, taking a syndemic approach calls for a biosocial or biocultural rather than simply a biological understanding of disease (pp.
Foucault notes that such regulation in the name of care is carried out through various interventions which work alongside existing rhythms in the biosocial collectivity rather than against them: they are in synergy with "natural processes .