biosolid

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biosolid

[¦bī·ō‚säl·əd]
(civil engineering)
A recyclable, primarily organic solid material produced by wastewater treatment processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the fall, after crops have been harvested, the alum residuals, lime residuals or biosolids are land applied.
To date, 175 hectares have been covered, thus applying more than 100,000 tonnes of biosolids that, otherwise, would have been diverted to a landfill.
'Utilisation of only 15 per cent of biosolids in brick production would reduce the carbon footprint of brick manufacturing whilst satisfying all the environmental and engineering requirements for bricks.'
The authority turned a problem into a success by converting a biosolid disposal issue into a process that now produces energy for the facility without raising rates.
The results found for pH are satisfactory, because very alkaline biosolids require great caution in their application in the soils, since the soil-biosolid mixture must have at least pH 7.0, as established by the CONAMA Resolution 375 (Brasil, 2006).
At Synagro, we see numerous new opportunities to capture the energy and organic benefits from biosolids and residual organics and we are excited about the prospect of partnering with the public sector to deliver real value to both the rate payers and the environment."
Landfills are an easy and common alternative for disposing of sludge or biosolids. However, they can result in technical and environmental problems due to the characteristics of the material.
Biosolids are the byproduct of a biological water treatment process at Pearl GTL whereby living micro-organisms, rather than chemicals, treat the industrial water produced in the gas-to-liquids conversion process.
2010; Saha and Hossain 2011); however, it provides little indication of the specific bioavailability, mobility or reactivity in soils amended with biosolids.
This material is known as biosolids and is composed of nutrients, organic matter, metals, organic contaminants and pathogenic microorganisms (EPA 2008).
6, was not well received by the group; they had hoped for more varied and cheaper options to handle the city's biosolids, according to a previous Empire report.
Mansfield-based Monsal provides advanced technology to treat biosolids and biowaste and convert it into renewable energy and saleable byproducts, with more than 200 installed anaerobic digestion systems.