biotite

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biotite

(bī`ətīt'), iron-rich variety of phlogopite, most abdunant of the micamica
, general term for a large group of minerals, hydrous silicates of aluminum and potassium, often containing magnesium, ferrous iron, ferric iron, sodium, and lithium and more rarely containing barium, chromium, and fluorine.
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 minerals.

Biotite

 

(after the French scientist J. B. Biot, 1774–1862), a mineral of the mica group. Biotite is structurally related to the micaceous aluminosilicates. Its chemical formula is K(Mg, Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH,F)2. The color of the thin sheets is from blackish-brown to brownish-green. Biotite occurs widely as a rock-forming mineral in igneous and metamorphic rocks. The largest biotite crystals, reaching 1–1.5 m, are found in pegmatite veins. Biotite is used in light-duty electrical insulating articles, and its powder is used in the preparation of bronze paint.,

biotite

[′bī·ə‚tīt]
(mineralogy)
A black, brown, or dark green, abundant and widely distributed species of rock-forming mineral in the mica group; its chemical composition is variable: K2[Fe(II),Mg]6-4[Fe(III),Al,Ti]0-2(Si6-5,Al2-3)O20-22(OH,F)4-2. Also known as black mica; iron mica; magnesia mica; magnesium-iron mica.
References in periodicals archive ?
86]Sr ratios of included biotite grains, compared to high values for their K-feldspar megacryst host (Fig.
86]Sr ratio is to start by muscovite dehydration melting with accompanying crystal growth of biotite and plagioclase.
Biotite and plagioclase occurring as phenocrysts and in the matrix associated with analyzed K-feldspar megacrysts (Table 2) have intermediate [sup.
The hosting of the reaction texture minerals in the cores of early euhedral-subhedral biotite and plagioclase crystals argues for an early primary magmatic origin.
A tectonic environment with hot asthenosphere approaching a fertile crust, coupled with ongoing extension in a back-arc setting, is ideal for generating high melt fractions by dehydration melting if muscovite or biotite or hornblende are present in the source (Thompson 1999).
One hundred and fifty microprobe analyses were carried out, comprising 46 analyses of plagioclase feldspar, 48 of amphibole (hornblende), 54 of biotite and 2 of tourmaline.
Analysis of cores and rims of three amphibole crystals showed slightly higher differences than for biotite, of 0.
Representative examples of biotite and amphibole analyses in sources are given in TABLE 4; full data are available on request from one of the authors (OWT).
Analyses of amphibole and biotite crystals were used in source discrimination.
It is particularly gratifying that the electron microprobe analysis has been successful, for it is now possible to determine the origins of a column by simply taking a few biotite or amphibole crystals, which is, to all intents, non-destructive.