bipolar

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Related to bipolarity: unipolarity

bipolar

1. having two poles
2. relating to or found at the North and South Poles
3. (of a transistor) utilizing both majority and minority charge carriers
4. Psychiatry suffering from bipolar manic-depressive disorder

bipolar

[bī′pō·lər]
(science and technology)
Having two poles.
Capable of assuming positive or negative values, such as an electric charge, or pertaining to a quantity with this property, such as a bipolar transistor.

bipolar

(electronics)

bipolar

(communications)
In digital transmission, an electrical line signalling method where the mark value alternates between positive and negative polarities.

See also AMI.
References in periodicals archive ?
Restoration of bipolarity turns out to be the worst possible scenario.
Just as bipolarity is often a strategic reason for a common law delegation, so, too, is the incrementalism inherent in the process--especially in situations where a context-specific narrow entitlement is preferable to a broad, uniform one that is likely to be either underextensive or overextensive.
They observed bipolarity and found out that the fines carried different polarities depending on the RH levels.
The bipolarity of feelings toward parents was a characteristic of both the research group and the comparison group.
In Anthony and Cleopatra the protagonists' greatness (in terms of position, reputation, self-esteem and sacrifice) and distance dramatizes the space of multiplied bipolarity (Rome vs.
No other category or location within this new bipolarity was either possible or tolerable.
Nevertheless, the author has presented a challenging thesis of how alliance dilemma and the structural model of triangles might explain the state behavior of Japan and the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s, a period when bipolarity began to dissolve and multipolarity emerged.
Phenomena such as religious fundamentalism, the explosion of ethnic tensions, and heated nationalism, which has been contained for so long within the grip of bipolarity, were then suddenly set free, surprising the world community with this new aggressiveness, from the Balkans to the Caucasus, Afghanistan to Pakistan, Iraq to Indonesia and Malaysia.
As introductory examples he offers a simple analysis of three nuclear-era identifiers: the Cold War, superpowers, and bipolarity.
led order, perhaps reprising the bipolarity of the Cold War system.
There would be no return to the days of bipolarity, still less multipolarity, and the US would seek to exploit the opportunity provided by this 'unipolar moment' as it set about reshaping the international political system broadly to its own specifications.
The vicious bipolarity of shame, that rapid cycling between confession and concealment .