Birchbark Canoe


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Birchbark Canoe

 

a canoe for one or two people, which is made of specially worked and sewn birch bark stretched over a light frame. Birchbark canoes were used by the southern Evenki (in the Podkamennaia and Nizhniaia Tunguska basins and others) and by the peoples of the Amur region. Birchbark canoes are sometimes used even today.

References in periodicals archive ?
Native peoples were the first to use these trees to make birchbark canoes.
His voyage in a birchbark canoe took him across the Rocky Mountains and through some of Canada's most dangerous river systems.
Although it had been more than a generation since the last birchbark canoe was built, in 1997 two more were built by elders, and another elder began making canoe models.
Brooks and her family are skilled birchbark canoe builders, and believe that the spirit of the grandfather "akwiten" has returned with the canoe.
Travelling in birchbark canoes with a hundred or so Frenchmen, an equal number of friendly Indians and the inevitable pair of priests, Cadillac picked a site on a bluff overlooking the strait between Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair, where he and his men spent some weeks building Fort Ponchartrain du Detroit.
The world spins along with little need for clipper ships or birchbark canoes, or a capable ice house switchman.
Today, paddlers in fiberglass canoes come seeking fun rather than furs, but they cover territory that appears much as it did when trappers traversed it in birchbark canoes.
From the building of birchbark canoes by the earliest natives to the crafting of great sailing ships and fine walnut clock cases in Colonial times, we learn how the subtleties of specific tree species were matched to needs for practical function and sheer beauty.
The protest group sees as evidence of the Indians' insincerity the fact that spearers today use aluminum canoes and high-powered flashlights to stalk walleyes in shallow water, rather than traditional birchbark canoes and flaming torches.
The next two chapters, which focus primarily on the Maritimes, largely concern themselves with Micmac birchbark canoes and with aboriginal stories about the origin of the canoe.