bird of prey


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bird of prey

a bird, such as a hawk, eagle, or owl, that hunts and kills other animals, esp vertebrates, for food. It has strong talons and a sharp hooked bill
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bird of prey

[′bərd əv ′prā]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of various carnivorous birds of the orders Falconiformes and Strigiformes which feed on meat taken by hunting.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just answer this question:What times of day do the bird of prey flying display take place?
Ricardi is the director of the Massachusetts Bird of Prey Rehabilitation Facility.
Poisoning a protected bird of prey is a criminal offence which can bring heavy fines.
On investigating further he came face-tobeak with a bird of prey.
Henry is not a danger to the public but, for the bird's safety, Warwick Castle's experts are advising people not to approach the bird of prey or try to capture him.
Buzzards, which can have a wing-span of four feet, are Britain's most common bird of prey and are increasingly seen in towns.
Several studies have concluded that persecution on intensively managed upland grouse moors is the key issue affecting some bird of prey populations .
Given the huge increase in bird of prey numbers in recent years, it is a phoney sort of war in my book with the RSPB Birdcrime report painting a very confusing picture.
The RSPB said nests belonging to the protected bird of prey had been targeted in two quarries in the last two weeks.
Bird of prey persecutions reported in 2006, included the unexplained disappearance of buzzards, hen harriers and goshawks, the theft of eggs, and destruction of nests.
AN injured bird of prey that was rescued from the side of a busy road has flown again after six months of expert care.