birdseye


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Related to birdseye: Clarence Birdseye

birdseye

[′bərdz‚ī]
(materials)
A small localized area in wood in which the fibers are indented and otherwise contorted to form few to many circular or elliptical figures on the tangential surface.
(textiles)
A fabric woven on a Dobby loom that is characterized by diamond-shaped spots.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This Captain Birdseye has piercing blue eyes and can leap from his boat into the sea for a swim with his grandchildren.
Clarence Birdseye, born in Brooklyn in 1886, was an adventurer and inventor with seemingly boundless ideas and energy.
Birdseye, C and Fitzgerald, G A 1932 History and present importance of quick freezing.
BLACKWELL'S Pork sausage pounds 5.99 kilo Braising steak pounds 7.50 kilo Chicken parmo pounds 8.80 kilo CO-OP Discovery Mexican Fajitas Kit, 470g was pounds 2.99, now pounds 1.49 FOX'S Own grown cauliflower 50p each Local grown tomatoes 80p lb, pounds 1.66 kilo Own grown fennel pounds 1.20 lb, pounds 2.65 kilo MORRISONS McVities Choc Hob Nobs, 300g pounds 1.35 each, buy one get one free SAINSBURY'S Pilgrim's Choice Farmhouse Mature Cheddar, 370g was pounds 3.99, now pounds 1.99 TESCO Birdseye simply 2 chunky beef burgers was pounds 2.99, now pounds 1.99
ANSWERS: 1 Opus Dei; 2 Pygmalion; 3 Gold; 4 Enid Blyton; 5 Birdseye frozen peas; 6 168; 7 Pontius Pilate; 8 Kirk Douglas; 9 The African; 10 B lur.
The word Birds Eye is synonymous with the frozen food industry, originating with the inventor of quick freezing, Clarence Birdseye, an early biological engineer.
From his office near the south end of the Eugene Airport's main runway, Harvey Birdseye looks out at a sky without a trace of blue and sees an abundant natural resource.
Kimmel, Berthe Amoss, Betsy Byars, Jean Fritz, Tom Birdseye, Helen Ketteman, and Johanna Hurwitz.
Sales of frozen food began in a small way in the 1860s, but the father of today's frozen food business was an American naturalist with the improbable name of Clarence Birdseye. Intelligent and insatiably curious, at the age of ten he was trapping muskrats in Long Island and selling them to a customer in England and he later helped to pay his college fees by catching live frogs for the Bronx Zoo to feed to its reptiles.
Thanks to Clarence Birdseye, frozen foods were introduced to retail customers more than 75 years ago.
BirdsEye 2.0 is a Web-based computer system-monitoring software that monitors up to 17 vital signs of any system, including internal and remote network applications, system logs and network connectivity, as well as hard disk, memory and CPU usage.
They have diversified into everything from Christmas trees, balsam wreaths and maple syrup to cabin rentals, fishing and hunting excursions, birdseye and curly maple lumber products, and veneer for Popsicle sticks.