birnessite


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birnessite

[bər′nes·īt]
(mineralogy)
A manganese oxide mineral often found as a primary constituent of manganese nodules or crusts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wang Q, Yang P, Zhu M (2018) Structural transformation of birnessite by fulvic acid under anoxic conditions.
Tang, "Adsorption behaviors of methylene blue from aqueous solution on mesoporous birnessite," Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers, vol.
He covers assessing manganese removal from over 100 groundwater treatment plants, manganese removal from groundwater: the characterization of filter media coating, the biological and physico-chemical formation of birnessite during the ripening of manganese removal filters, identifying the bacterial population in manganese removal filters, reducing the ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide coated media, and factors controlling the ripening of manganese removal filters in conventional aeration-filtration groundwater treatment.
Indeed, recent work showed that ANME-2d could be involved in AOM coupled to chromium(VI) reduction [141] (Table 1, reaction (5)) and in AOM coupled to the reduction of soluble iron and insoluble ferrihydrite and birnessite minerals [142] (Table 1, reactions (3) and (4)).
Suarez, "Arsenic(III) oxidation and arsenic(V) adsorption reactions on synthetic birnessite," Environmental Science and Technology, vol.
Psilomelane, corresponding to Haidinger's "uncleavable manganese ore," was the name given to some dull black, sometimes reniform, massive specimens and, presumably, to whichever massive, dull black manganese ores were not instead designated "wad." Although still in widespread use among mineral collectors, "psilomelane" properly does not denote a valid species but rather a mixture of cryptomelane, romanechite, hollandite and birnessite (Bayliss, 2000).
The researchers reacted chromite with birnessite, a manganese-containing mineral that often forms in weathered rocks and soils containing chromite.
BET [N.sub.2] surface area was measured with a Micromeritics Gemini III 2375 [N.sub.2]-adsorption surface area analyser after the mineral had been degassed under vacuum at 105[degrees]C overnight, except for the ferrihydrite and birnessite, which were degassed under vacuum at room temperature.
Yao, "Rational design of coaxial mesoporous birnessite manganese dioxide/amorphous-carbon nanotubes arrays for advanced asymmetric supercapacitors," Journal of Power Sources, vol.
Birnessite (Figure 2) has a layered structure and it is a typical [delta]-type manganese dioxide material.
Pereira-Ramos, "Raman spectra of birnessite manganese dioxides," Solid State Ionics, vol.
The standards selected for Mn were birnessite [([(Na, Ca).sub.0.5]([Mn.sup.4+], [Mn.sup.3+]).sub.2] [O.sub.4].1.5[H.sub.2]O), hureaulite ([(Mn, Fe).sub.5][H.sub.2][(P[O.sub.4]).sub.4].4[H.sub.2]O), manganocalcite (Mn-CaC[O.sub.3]), Mn-carbonate (MnC[O.sub.3]), Mn-sulfate (MnS[O.sub.4]), bixbyite ([Mn.sub.2][O.sub.3]), pyrolusite (Mn[O.sub.2]), and switzerite ([(Mn, Fe).sub.3][(P[O.sub.4]).sub.2].7[H.sub.2]O).