birth defect


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birth defect

[′bərth di′fekt]
(medicine)
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers said that common illnesses like malaria (34.8 per cent ), typhoid (6.9 per cent), hypertension (56.5 per cent), pregestational diabetes (17.4 per cent) and HIV (13.0 per cent ) were implicated in birth defects over a 10-year period at the hospital.
Parker, Ph.D., from the Boston University School of Public Health, and colleagues used data from two case-control studies (the National Birth Defects Prevention Study and the Slone Birth Defects Study) to examine the prevalence of ondansetron use for treatment of first-trimester nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.
Birth defects potentially linked to cases of Zika virus in the United States have increased by a factor of nearly 20 since the virus first made its way into the country, according to new findings by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Women across the country who have become pregnant while taking the medication accuse GlaxoSmithKline of allegedly failing to provide the public with adequate warnings about the risk of Zofran birth defects. Recent reports indicate that GlaxoSmithKline knew as far back as 1992, that Zofran was capable of passing through the human placenta and putting unborn babies at risk for serious harm.
In "The March of Dimes Global Report on Birth Defects", the UAE is ranked sixth out of 193 countries when it comes to children being born with birth defects, with neighbours Sudan and Saudi Arabia topping the list.
Background: To investigate the surveillance trend of birth defects, incidence, distribution, occurrence regularity, and their relevant factors in Xi'an City in the last 10 years for proposing control measures.
Babies born to mothers who used recreational drugs during pregnancy are more likely to have birth defects in the brain, said a study.
However some of these birth defects are fatal and serious if they are not treated right within a few days of the birth."
Birth defects are an important public health issue because they are the leading cause of infant mortality in the United States of America (USA) causing one in every five infant deaths [1].
[2] To encapsulate its meaning in a manner relevant to people with birth defects. I will use Nora Jacobson's[3] definition contained in her comprehensive review of dignity and health:
In the most comprehensive study of its kind in the world, researchers from the University's Robinson Institute have compared the risk of major birth defects for each of the reproductive therapies commonly available internationally, such as: IVF (in vitro fertilization), ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) and ovulation induction.
Birth Defects: Birth defects are abnormalities present at birth that result in mental or physical disabilities.