bishop


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bishop:

see orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bishop

 

in the Orthodox, Catholic, and Anglican churches the highest order of clergyman, head of a territorial unit of ecclesiastic administration (eparchy, diocese). Christian literary documents of the early second century (the Epistles of Ignatius of Antioch) attest to their managing the property of the early Christian communities. By the late second century the bishops had already concentrated spiritual and juridical authority in their hands and had also possessed themselves of the right to dispose of the community’s property; gradually a monarchical episcopate developed. In the fourth century there began to emerge among the bishops a hierarchical division into patriarchs, metropolitans (some of these bearing the title of archbishop), and bishops proper. The title of bishop has been preserved in some Protestant churches in addition to the Anglican, but in them a bishop is not a clergyman but a person exercising what are for the most part purely administrative functions.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bishop

1. (in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Greek Orthodox Churches) a clergyman having spiritual and administrative powers over a diocese or province of the Church
2. (in some Protestant Churches) a spiritual overseer of a local church or a number of churches
3. a chesspiece, capable of moving diagonally over any number of unoccupied squares of the same colour
4. mulled wine, usually port, spiced with oranges, cloves, etc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
The Bishop was silent, and for once Ernest forbore to press the point.
"And I shall protest." The Bishop straightened himself in his chair, and over his gentle face spread the harshness of the warrior.
He laughed brutally, and I was driven to the Bishop's defence.
Both the Bishop and my father were embarrassed and perturbed.
And so it came about that both the Bishop and I accepted Ernest's challenges.
"May Heaven forfend!" cried the Bishop earnestly; for he knew right well what manner of feast it was that Robin Hood gave his guests in Sherwood Forest.
Now the Bishop was short and fat, and Little John was long and lean.
You're the finest Bishop that ever I saw in my life.
"Now belike I see a worthy friar in the back of this church who can say a better service than ever my lord Bishop of Hereford.
'I will come to-morrow as I drive by.' Bar and Bishop had both been bystanders during this short dialogue, and as Mr Merdle was swept away by the crowd, they made their remarks upon it to the Physician.
We did hear that from one bishop during a meeting with our board, although he later told me that he didn't really mean it.
The other six men, representing various aspects of the bishop's life and ministry, were arranged along either side of the coffin, but as the communications director said darkly to the monk afterwards, It wasn't like those six fellas in the middle were doing a whole hell of a lot of work, if you know what I mean.