bistatic radar


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bistatic radar

[′bī‚stad·ik ′rā‚där]
(engineering)
Radar system in which the receiver is some distance from the transmitter, with separate antennas for each.

bistatic radar

bistatic radarclick for a larger image
A radar system having separate antennae for transmission and reception. These are normally located at different locations. See also monostatic radar.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Experimental Study of LTE Signals as Illuminators of Opportunity for Passive Bistatic Radar Applications.
Objective: This proposal brings forward a passive bistatic radar (PBR) based on Galileo transmissions for maritime surveillance.
France has recently embarked on a permanent space surveillance capability in a newly-opened facility near Lyons; manned 24/7 by air force crews, it will deploy the Systeme d'Information Spatiale, a space situational awareness C2 granted to a consortium led by Thales Alenia Space end-2014; the SIS will leverage expert tracking of space weather, as well as the modernised Graves bistatic radar mapping objects in low orbit, designating some to dedicated orbitography radars or optical telescopes.
This observing technique, known as bistatic radar, has been used to study many objects in our solar system, including asteroids and other planets.
He, "High resolution ISAR imaging in receiver centered region area in bistatic radar," EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing, Vol.
Lee, "Full wave solutions for rough-surface bistatic radar cross sections: Comparison with small perturbation," Physical Optics, Numerical and Experimental Results.
This paper presents modeling and implementation of STAP algorithm for target detection in passive bistatic radar case using a uniform circular array to capture the signals of interest.
Bistatic radar is the term used "to describe the orientation of the radar system in which the transmitting and receiving antennas are physically separated (fig.
Mini-RF is currently acquiring new bistatic radar images of the moon using a signal transmitted by the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico.
The bistatic radar cross sections are calculated under different conditions using 2-D TE model for a conductive cylinder covered with inhomogeneous, time-varying magnetized plasma.
Lately a renewed interest in bistatic radar (transmitter and receiver are in different positions) has awakened, due to some of the key advantages of this configuration.