bistatic radar


Also found in: Wikipedia.

bistatic radar

[′bī‚stad·ik ′rā‚där]
(engineering)
Radar system in which the receiver is some distance from the transmitter, with separate antennas for each.

bistatic radar

bistatic radarclick for a larger image
A radar system having separate antennae for transmission and reception. These are normally located at different locations. See also monostatic radar.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
We consider a general bistatic radar scene with a target as shown in Figure 1.
The model may facilitate the investigations and understandings on the mean levels of bistatic radar cross sections (RCS) returns from electrically large sea scene with ship-like targets.
One approach for improving radar survivability is the use of bistatic radar, in which the radar's transmitter and receiver use different antennas which are separated by some distance.
Bistatic radar with the widely separated transmitter and receiver has the advantages of covert receivers, giving increased immunity to antiradiation missiles and electronic countermeasures, and possible antistealth capabilities [1].
Included are monopulse radar, low-probability-of-in-tercept waveforms, low and ultra-low sidelobe antennas, adaptive antenna arrays, bistatic radar and pulsed Doppler radar.
It is known that a bistatic radar system can overcome the above drawbacks.
They are: * low-frequency radar * very high frequency radar * carrier-free radar * bistatic radar.
Another possible stealth countermeasure is bistatic radar, where the receiver is separate from the transmitter.
Hence, the model must be able to deal with the target's bistatic radar cross section, [[sigma].sub.B], which is a measure of the target's reflective properties when viewed by a separated illuminator and receiver.
A bistatic radar is defined as having the receivers and transmitters widely separated by distances equivalent to the target range.
Mainly, additional positioning capabilities must be provided to enable bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurements.
NASA and the NSF were able to obtain the images using what is known as a "bistatic radar configuration." In this process, one telescope would transmit signals and another would receive them, resulting to clearer images than ones obtained by just one telescope.