bit pattern


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

bit pattern

[′bit ‚pad·ərn]
(computer science)
A combination of binary digits arranged in a sequence.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bit pattern

(data)
A sequence of bits, in a memory, a communications channel or some other device. The term is used to contrast this with some higher level interpretation of the bits such as an integer or an image. A bit string is similar but suggests an arbitrary, as opposed to predetermined, length.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

bit pattern

A specific layout of binary digits. See bitmap.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
A simple and fast regression noise model of the N-coupled TSVs is developed to apply to the high-level simulation where a large amount of bit pattern scenarios can be simulated.
This effect of the current bit voltage level being dependent on the previous bit pattern is called intersymbol interference or ISI.
DSSS generates a redundant bit pattern, or chip, for each bit to be transmitted, so that if part of the message is lost, the data can still be recovered without retransmission by using statistical techniques.
It is important to note that the CPU doesn't "know" what residue system is intended; it is wired to produce a double-word bit pattern for arithmetic operations on pairs of one-word integer bit patterns.
This isn't possible if a truly random noise source is used, especially when some errors may relate to ISI effects caused by specific bit pattern history.
Logic triggers let users set a bit pattern of up to eight bits, and digital inputs can trigger analog inputs and vice versa.
DSSS generates a redundant bit pattern, or chip, for each bit to be transmitted, so that, if part of the pattern is lost, the data can still be recovered without retransmission by using statistical techniques.
Not unlike Postscript or HTML or some of these other types of languages where one word that's very easy to transmit describes a bit pattern."