bit string

bit string

[′bit ‚striŋ]
(computer science)
A set of consecutive binary digits representing data in coded form, in which the significance of each bit is determined by its position in the sequence and its relation to the other bits.

bit string

(programming, data)
An ordered sequence of bits. This is very similar to a bit pattern except that the term "string" suggests an arbitrary length sequence as opposed to a pre-determined length "pattern".
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 3(a) elaborated the typical matching rule in which detectors are generated through a process of negative selection with bit string comprises of parent, average estimate and hop count.
This bit string challenge looks for missing information, and is not a computational horsepower comparison between classical and quantum computers.
The bit string is set up out of a set of selected local patch comparisons to describe the structure of the central patch.
But, on the other hand, the probability for a bit at a given position l in a random bit string to be 1 is 0.
When encrypting two plain texts, this takes advantage of the characteristics of polynomial multiplication, reordering the bit string of one in ascending order, the other in descending order, and then converting both to polynomials, which makes it possible for inner products of encrypted bit strings to be calculated as a batch.
A representation is not necessarily a contiguous bit string, but may consist of separate blocks of memory that could be just anywhere in the address space.
Hence, one encrypts and randomizes the bit string by a bitwise exclusive or with a key string, and then embeds it by performing a bitwise exclusive or with the lowermost bit of selected pixel values.
Given a fixed-length binary code for the state space of a planning problem, BDDs can be used to represent the characteristic function of a set of states (which evaluates to true for a given bit string, that is, state, if and only if it is a member of this set).
Once the message is received, the receiver recreates the hash bit string by applying the hashing algorithm to the message.
Essentially, these tools generate the configuration bit string, given such inputs as a logic diagram or a high-level functional description.
This may sound impossible--how can you check that a bit string is a satisfying assignment without reading every bit in it?