Ceratopogonidae

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Ceratopogonidae

 

(also Heleidae), a family of insects of the order Diptera. Body length, 1–2.5 mm. The insects are distributed everywhere but are most numerous in forests. In the USSR there are 18 genera, of which three—Culicoides, Leptoconops, and Lasiohelea—are bloodsucking insects. The insects differ from the Simuliidae and Phlebotomidae in that they have 13- to 15-jointed antennae and wings that are usually spotted and lie flat on the abdomen when at rest.

The larvae and pupae of Ceratopogonidae develop in brooks, marshes, ponds, and moist earth. The larvae winter; the adults appear in April or May and disappear in September or October. Only the females are bloodsucking; they attack humans and domestic and wild animals. The insects are intermediate hosts of some species of parasitic worms that infest man (in the tropics) and domestic animals (onchocercosis in horses). Control measures include the use of various repellents.

REFERENCES

Gutsevich, A. V., and V. M. Glukhova. Melody sbora i izucheniia krovososushchikh mokretsov. Leningrad, 1970.
Gutsevich, A. V. Krovososushchie mokretsy. (Ceratopogonidae). Leningrad, 1973. (Fauna SSSR: Nasekomye dvukrylye, vol. 3, issue 5.)

A. V. GUTSEVICH

References in periodicals archive ?
Preparation and mounting of biting midges of the genus Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to be observed with Scanning Electron Microscope.
The influence of host number on the attraction of biting midges, Culicoides spp, to light traps.
A small collection of biting midges of the genus Culicoides from Bolivia (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae).
Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for characterization of Culicoides nubeculosus biting midges. Med Vet Entomol 2011; 25: 32-8.
Catalog of the New World biting midges south of the United States of America (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).
Viruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges cause economically important diseases in ruminants worldwide.
Forcipomyia Meigen, 1818 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a worldwide genus, is one of the species-richest genera in the biting midges, with many species being important pollinators of tropical and subtropical cultivated plants (Young 1986; Martinez et al.
Mosquitoes are present whenever rainfall occurs as well as in artificial lakes, and Dr Jubran said that people mistake biting midges for mosquitoes, which is a different kind of species but are also prominent around the creeks and artificial lakes.
We are told that one jab should be enough to protect sheep and cattle from the dreadful disease that is spread by biting midges and causes deformities in newborn lambs and calves.
With guaranteed results, unsurpassed customer satisfaction and continual testing, Mosquito Shield is the Northeast's premier mosquito control company, that provides a guaranteed protection plan for all types of insects, including black flies, biting midges, mosquitoes and more.
Hemorrhagic disease is an endemic disease that strikes periodically throughout whitetail country and is transmitted by biting midges. The disease causes internal bleeding and is almost always fatal.
"In seven years we have never recorded biting midges in November before and I suspect this is the first time ever, long before records began.