gentian

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gentian

(jĕn`shən), common name for some members of the Gentianaceae, a family of widely distributed herbs, chiefly perennial and fall blooming. There are many types of gentians (genus Gentiana and similar species of other genera), most of which have blue flowers. Gentians flourish in north-temperate and alpine regions. Many are grown as ornamentals in rock gardens; the alpine blue gentian (usually G. acaulis, native to Europe) is most common. Indigenous North American species include the bottle, or closed, gentian of the East, the similar soapwort gentian of the West, and several fringed gentians (especially G. crinita), rare and beautiful wildflowers cultivated with difficulty in gardens. Some members of the family are aquatic or marsh plants, e.g., the marsh pinks (genus Sabatia) and the floating heart, or water snowflake (genus Nymphoides). Stomachics and bitter tonics have been made from ancient times from the rhizomes and roots of several species, especially the European yellow gentian (G. lutea), which is also used in the manufacture of liqueurs. Gentians are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Gentianales, family Gentianaceae.
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gentian

gentian

A famous “bitter” for digestive disorders. There are over 400 varieties of Gentian with different colored flowers etc. Gentians have opposite leaves and trumpet-shaped flowers that are blue, white, yellow or red. Gentiana Lutea is the famous medicinal herb. The dried root is the most commonly used part, but fresh above-ground parts can be used also. It’s quite bitter, so it stimulates and helps the liver and gallbladder, promoting better functioning of the digestive system, increasing secretions of the stomach and saliva which increases the appetite, stimulates digestive juices, decreases intestinal inflammation, indigestion, heartburn, liver, spleen, menstruation, gout, arthritis, strengthens and builds body. Also helps nutrients absorb more rapidly into the gut, including iron and B12. Great for anemia. Said to be good for restoring people who have a weak digestive system and just don’t want to eat anymore. Used for malaria, parasites, circulation, pancreatitis, arteries, arthritis, bodybuilding, strength, circulation, diabetes, endurance, energy, gallbladder, liver, gout, heartburn, irritable bowel, menstrual, nutrient absorption, pancreas, spleen, thyroid, acne, . Do not use during pregnancy.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

gentian

1. any gentianaceous plant of the genera Gentiana or Gentianella, having blue, yellow, white, or red showy flowers
2. the bitter-tasting dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea (European or yellow gentian), which can be used as a tonic
3. any of several similar plants, such as the horse gentian
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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