bitter

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bitter

Brit beer with a high hop content, with a slightly bitter taste
References in classic literature ?
Lower and lower his head drooped until it was buried in his folded arms - and the hour which followed he always reckoned the bitterest of his life.
But the memory of that race remained for long in his heart, the cruelest and bitterest memory of his life.
Here he recounted the details of his adventure, with swelling chest and so considerable swagger that he quite impressed even his bitterest enemies, while Kala fairly danced for joy and pride.
She sees him on the iceberg now, at the mercy of the bitterest enemy he has on earth.
The imperfections in her personal appearance--and especially in her complexion--were subjects to her of the bitterest regret.
Should you wish your daughter to despise you - or, at least, to feel no vestige of respect for you, and no affection but what is mingled with the bitterest regret?
At first I started back, unable to believe that it was indeed I who was reflected in the mirror; and when I became fully convinced that I was in reality the monster that I am, I was filled with the bitterest sensations of despondence and mortification.
But, barring this drawback, I am bound to own that he has stated no more than the truth in representing me as wounded to the heart by Rachel's treatment, and as leaving England in the first keenness of suffering caused by the bitterest disappointment of my life.
It is one of the bitterest apportionments of a lot of slavery, that the negro, sympathetic and assimilative, after acquiring, in a refined family, the tastes and feelings which form the atmosphere of such a place, is not the less liable to become the bond-slave of the coarsest and most brutal,--just as a chair or table, which once decorated the superb saloon, comes, at last, battered and defaced, to the barroom of some filthy tavern, or some low haunt of vulgar debauchery.
Often thought of as a kids' book it is one of Swift's bitterest satires on "that animal called man.
Cultural vandalism trumps our collective inheritance now and in the future, the bitterest of pills to swallow and the cruel price of 'progress'.
His parents' realisation that the doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital were acting in his best interest is surely the bitterest pill they could swallow.