bittern


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Related to bittern: bitten, American bittern, least bittern

bittern,

common name for migratory marsh birds of the family Ardeidae (heronheron
, common name for members of the family Ardeidae, large wading birds including the bittern and the egret, found in most temperate regions but most numerous in tropical and subtropical areas.
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 family). The American bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), often called "stake driver" because of a territorial male's booming call in the spring, is widely distributed in E North America. It is mostly nocturnal and feeds on frogs, fish, and insects. When pursued, the bittern escapes detection by standing motionless with its bill uplifted, its brown and yellow markings and striped foreneck blending with the marsh grasses. It is about 2 to 3 ft (61–91 cm) tall; the western and eastern least bitterns, genus Ixobrychus, are about half this size. Of the 12 species of bitterns, 8 constitute the smaller birds. The female bittern builds the nest, which consists of an unkempt arrangement of sedge grass and reeds. The nests are built on the ground along rivers or lakeshores and house the clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. Both male and female share the incubation duties. Bitterns are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Ciconiiformes, family Ardeidae.

bittern

[′bid·ərn]
(chemical engineering)
Concentrated sea water or brine containing the bromides and magnesium and calcium salts left in solution after sodium chloride has been removed by crystallization.
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of various herons of the genus Botaurus characterized by streaked and speckled plumage.

bittern

1
any wading bird of the genera Ixobrychus and Botaurus, related and similar to the herons but with shorter legs and neck, a stouter body, and a booming call: family Ardeidae, order Ciconiiformes

bittern

2
the bitter liquid remaining after common salt has been crystallized out of sea water: a source of magnesium, bromine, and iodine compounds
References in periodicals archive ?
"Ian B" reported: "Little bittern showed well before retreating to bark for two hours."
While the thyroid artery has been ascertained to stem directly from the brachiocephalic trunk in the kiwi (Glenny, 1942b), it has been shown to originate from the carotid artery in the Eurasian bittern (Erdogan, 2012).
Bittern's connections will fancy her chance of upholding the form.
9, a Sunday, when they heard a commotion, which turned out to be three men going after the bittern. When they got to the scene the bird had been hacked to death.
The "booming" call of the male bittern seeking a mate in the spring is the giveaway to the presence of what is an elusive bird.
Former winner Oscar Dewhurst, 17, chose bitterns and took pictures of the wading birds around London parks.
The RSPB's Martin Harper said: "To lose the bittern once in Britain was regrettable, but to have lost it twice would have been unforgiveable."
sea bittern at Rann of Kutch and the technically competent and experienced key managerial personnel.
The interests also include Suncora[euro](tm)s share of the ownership of the Triton floating production, storage and offloading vessel related to the Guillemot West/North West and Bittern fields.</p><p>The sale is expected to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2010, subject to Dana Petroleum shareholder approval and other closing conditions.</p><p>(USD1=GBP0.65)</p>
Among the optimistic was Diana Bittern, director of product management at Knovel, which was celebrating its 10th anniversary at the SLA event.
Almost 60 per cent of Britain's rarest birds, including once-extinct species such as the bittern, avocet and osprey, have seen their numbers increase over the past decade, a coalition of conservation groups said today.
Another distinctive call you are likely to hear in the Fern Ridge area is the "oonk-a-lunk" of the American Bittern.