black bile


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Related to black bile: yellow bile

black bile

humor effecting temperament of gloominess. [Medieval Physiology: Hall, 130]
References in periodicals archive ?
GALEN'S MAJOR WORKS: His "On the Elements according to Hippocrates" describes the philosopher's system of four bodily humours, blood, yellow bile, black bile and phlegm, which were identified with the four classical elements and in turn with the seasons.
But I started bringing up all this black bile and I simply couldn't sustain any water.
After an initial round of coction in the stomach, Galenic medicine asserted that there was a secondary process of coction in the liver that formed all the humors sequentially: Blood first, then Phlegma, Bile and finally Black Bile.
Key to this approach were observations of blood drying, resulting in the theory that there are four types of bodily fluids or humors: blood, phlegm, bile, and black bile.
The black bile is associated with toxins in the body and believed to be responsible for various diseases and ailments.
Black bile, he argues, is likely to consume us every time, but from the ashes a new world, a new morality, a new life will emerge.
31) In the Qanun, Ibn-Sina elaborates several symptoms of melancholia resulting from black bile, including a "constant melancholic anxiety, and a constant looking at only one thing, and at the earth"; "the body's blackness, its dryness"; "a scarcity of digestion because of the coldness of the melancholic condition"; and "sleeplessness" and "sluggishness in the sun.
Standard dogma through antiquity for close on a millennium was that all tumours resulted from an inflammatory process caused by an abnormal flux of tumours, in which an excess of black bile was crucial.
Classical Greece had a similar philosophy of cuisine (probably imported from China) and named four humors (blood black bile yellow bile phlegm) and their essences (heat cold dry moist).
The term "melancholia" has been endlessly discussed across various cultures throughout the centuries, using the theory of humorism, whereby Greek and Roman physicians contended that the human body consists of four humors: Black Bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood.
Hippocrates, the father of medicine, speculated that there were four humors--fluids--in the body: yellow bile, red bile, black bile and phlegm.