black cohosh


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Related to black cohosh: red clover, dong quai, Evening primrose oil
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black cohosh

black cohosh

Good for women. See also Blue Cohosh. The root is most commonly used part and is a good phytoestrogen source used traditionally to balance hormones (lowers ovary production of progesterone) and control hot flashes, PMS, gynecological disorders, menopause, depression, nervous disorders, arthritis, rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, infections, sore throat, bronchitis, stimulates menstrual flow, helps curb diarrhea, cough suppressant, lowers blood pressure, tinnitus (ringing ears). Powerful cardiac stimulant, but has a sedative effect on the nervous system. Often taken together with St. John’s Wort. Do not take during pregnancy. Grows up to 8 ft. with columns of white flowers. Leaves look like baneberry which is poisonous, but baneberry has red shiny berries. Test first, Some women have experienced upset stomach. Avoid if you have breast cancer. May cause headaches, nausea, impaired vision, vertigo, miscarriage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy and tolerability of a medicinal product containing an isopropanolic black cohosh extract in Chinese women with menopausal symptoms: A randomized, double blind, parallel-controlled study versus tibolone.
There were 56 women in the black cohosh group and 60 women in the Tibolone group.
For better evaluation of the varied results from clinical trials, it is necessary to examine the long-term stability of black cohosh and whether this might change over the duration of a clinical trial, which typically takes multiple years to accrue the full complement of subjects and to run all to completion.
Study participants used an average daily oral preparation of 40 mg of black cohosh for an average of 23 weeks.
AS nearly all black cohosh sold commercially is collected from natural forest populations, the potential for harvesting impacts is considerable (Chamberlain et al.
Some research suggests that black cohosh is no better than placebo at improving hot flashes.
Data from a recent metaanalysis showed that although there was significant heterogeneity between included trials, preparations containing black cohosh improved vasomotor symptoms overall by 26% (95% CI, 11%-40%).
In 2006, a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was done using a combination trial of black cohosh and St.
Larimore placed soy extracts and two German extracts of black cohosh sold in the United States under the brand names Remifemin and Klimadynon.
Second was black cohosh (46%), followed by soy supplements and food (42%), antidepressants (32%), meditation and relaxation (26%), evening primrose oil (17%), and blood pressure medications (14%), Some respondents said they used more than one therapy.
But overall, survey respondents perceived antidepressants to be one of the most effective methods, followed by homeopathy, meditation and relaxation, evening primrose, blood pressure medications, black cohosh, soy products, and multivitamins and calcium.
However, we do find trends, most notably sharp declines in sales of women's supplements like soy and black cohosh, as well as declines in calcium sales, which skew heavily toward women concerned about osteoporosis.