black dwarf


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Related to black dwarf: black hole, brown dwarf

black dwarf

See white dwarf.

black dwarf

[¦blak ′dwȯrf]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
An American astronomer named Shiv Kumar first predicted these strange objects might exist in 1963, and he called them black dwarfs.
Red Ally and his friends around the Black Dwarf were for a time a colourful part of the Scottish left.
Wooler, the editor and publisher of The Black Dwarf Jones reveals Wooler's opportunistic blending of satirical and sentimental modes in the pages of his weekly journal, and he explores a wide range of possible referents for the journal's titular figure, finding antecedents in Walter Scott's novel of the same name, the Africans and dwarves exhibited in London sideshows, and the plebeian radicals who represented a stone-throwing threat to the Regent.
A historian of revolutions sparked from below, she taught extension classes to workers throughout her Black Dwarf years.
Carrey plays endlessly good-natured cop Charlie, who even takes raising triplets by his estranged wife's black dwarf lover in his stride.
Back in the 60s Rowbotham's radical inclinations, which took on an increasingly anarchistic tinge as the decade progressed, found expression in work for the radical journal Black Dwarf for which, after encouragement from firebrand student radical Tariq Ali, she would contribute one of the first articles on women's liberation.
Rooted in the 60s DIY pop culture mentality from which it has arguably never escaped, Tony Elliott felt that other magazines of the time like Oz and Black Dwarf were too polemical and not interested in 'packaging actual information'.
Wooler's trial for the publication of the Black Dwarf and Richard Carlile's trial for his republican activities including publication of Paine's works - that offer more similarities than Epstein is able to utilize effectively because he treats them in separate chapters with very different purposes.
Brown dwarfs are believed to give off infrared light in the range between that of a red dwarf (a very small star) and a black dwarf (the object left over after a star has died and its white dwarf has cooled).
But you don't need to totally (or even partially) keep up with Cox as he's burbling on about the arrow of time, the second law of ther modynamics, entropy and red, white and black dwarfs to derive pleasure from this series.