black power movement


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Related to black power movement: Stokely Carmichael

black power movement

a militant SOCIAL MOVEMENT, originating in the US in the mid-1960s, which emphasized the role of the white-dominated power structure in subordinating black people. It argued that power had to be taken by blacks, from whites, in order to materially improve the situation of black people. The movement was one of a number of radical responses amongst black activists to the perceived failure of the CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT to achieve real improvements in the conditions of black people, and its concentration on the segregated, rural, Southern states at the expense of urban ghettoes. The black power movement has been particularly associated with the takeover of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) by a group of more radical members, the most prominent being Stokely Carmichael. Two contemporary quotes serve to underline the developments. SNCC (pronounced ‘Snick’), since its inception in 1960, had been at the forefront of more confrontational and high-profile CIVIL RIGHTS activities, including college sit-ins, Freedom Rides (integrated buses), voter-registration drives, etc. In a book written just before the emergence of the black power movement. Paul Jacobs and Saul Lindau (1966) wrote: ‘The weary veterans of harassment, arrest, beatings, and the psychological torture of living in the South have begun to re-examine their objectives at the very time they confront the full and often subtle power of the American economic and political system.’ In the same year, writing about the emergence of black power, Carmichael wrote: ‘We had to work for power because this country does not function by morality, love and nonviolence, but by power… integration is a subterfuge to maintain white supremacy’ (reprinted in Floyd Barbour (ed.), 1969). This shift, drawing on a number of black separatist and black pride themes, castigated ‘the system’ as racist and unreformable, and emphasized black autonomy and self reliance.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, more details should be added to the role of African American women in the city's Black power movement. Second, more attention is needed on the topic of the involvement of children and young adults in the city's Civil Rights movement.
The black power movement has again taught us that unless we realistically and honestly examine our assumptions in the light of the concrete situation, our highest values may become but a way of blinding us to the injustice that we are helping to perpetuate.
While the author recounts Grace Lee Boggs' early life as a child of Chinese immigrants, there is no discussion of her experience as an Asian American woman within the leadership of Detroit's nascent black power movement. Ward simply states in his introduction that "Grace developed a political identity as a black movement activist" and leaves it at that.
Chapter two examines how those within the Black Power movement drew linkages between the dispossession of Palestinians and the ghettoization of African Americans within the US.
The Black Power Movement was a young people's movement and had followers on most university campuses as well as in working class communities.
Nico Slate's edited volume Black Power Beyond Borders: The Global Dimensions of the Black Power Movement is one of the newest works in this field that "examines how concepts of Black Power were translated not just across national boundaries but also across time, political movements, and race itself" (p.
A self-styled "poet of the revolution," he was active in the Black Power movement that, in the narrative present, is over and "done." Key to Is Just a Movie is Lovelace's deft positioning of his narrator amid his characters--not behind them, like Flaubert's.
The book's roughly chronological chapters begin with the emergence of student dissent in the Jim Crow era and continue through the sexual revolution and the Black Power movement of the late 1960s.
While the student activists shared the goals of social justice and inclusion with the civil rights movement, their activism took its tactics from the Black Power movement, Biondi writes.
Tommie Smith, the 200m gold medallist, and John Carlos, who took bronze, made a raised-fist gesture and wore black gloves on the winners' podium as part of the Black Power movement.
Diane Pecknold's excellent "Travel with Me: Country, Music, Race, and Remembrance" reveals the Black Power movement's unlikely country music roots as demonstrated, in part, by Isaac Hayes's version of Jimmy Webb's By the Time I Get to Phoenix.
Spectacular Blackness: The Cultural Politics of the Black Power Movement and the Search for a Black Aesthetic.