black-and-white television

black-and-white television

[¦blak ən ¦wīt ′tel·ə‚vizh·ən]
(communications)
References in periodicals archive ?
LESS than 100 people are now watching black-and-white television in the North East, new figures show.
SET CHOICE: Jean Perry, of Danescourt, Cardiff, with her 14 inch Hitachi black-and-white television set showing The Weakest Link PICTURE: Andrew Davies [umlaut]
In May 1969 Hawaii Business reported that "Television sales as a whole have jumped from 33,000 sets in 1966 to 40,000 this year," with a growing emphasis on In 1966, black-and-white television purchases outnumbered color by 2-to-1.
He puts the paper down, and one of his ashy hands crushes an empty Colt 45 Malt Liquor can in front of a black-and-white television with the volume quite loud.
The penetration of color television is so great that recent statistics published by the Electronic Industries Association indicated black-and-white television would shortly become extinct.
Its basic criterion for acceptance was that it had to be compatible with the existing population of black-and-white television sets.
So then, just how many of us still use black-and-white televisions? Well, despite the digital age, here in Newcastle 85 households still prefer black-and-white TV sets, according to the TV Licensing Authority.
Black-and-white televisions have become increasingly rare on the high street but they are still available online.