blackjack

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Related to blackjack oak: black hickory, turkey oak

blackjack,

one of the world's most widely played gambling card games; also known as twenty-one or vingt-et-un. Despite contesting claims between the French and Italians, its origins are unknown. Each player receives one card face down and bets that this card plus additional cards dealt face up will beat the dealer's hand without exceeding 21. An ace counts one or eleven, a face card ten, and all others cards according to their face value. A score of 21 on the first two cards is called blackjack.
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blackjack

1 Cards
1. pontoon or any of various similar card games
2. the ace of spades

blackjack

2
a dark iron-rich variety of the mineral sphalerite

blackjack

3
a small oak tree, Quercus marilandica, of the southeastern US, with blackish bark and fan-shaped leaves
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Only post oak exceeded 40 cm DBH, and only a handful of blackjack oak and mockernut hickory were [greater than or equal to] 25 cm DBH.
Blackjack oak comprised 25.6% of the basal area at the Christmas Knob site, but only 6.8% at Big Creek Narrows.
Given that post oak and blackjack oak can sprout prolifically from the stump and this is probably their primary mode of regeneration in the Cross Timbers (Clark and Hallgren, 2003), clumps of overstory trees were expected.
Overstory dominance by post oak and blackjack oak in the Cross Timbers, often exceeding 75% of all trees, has been repeatedly noted (e.g., Rice and Penfound, 1959; Johnson and Risser, 1972, 1975; Peppers, 2004; Clark et al., 2005; Burton et al., 2010; Cerny, 2010) and our data were similar.
On average, the post oaks at the Big Creek Narrows site were larger in girth and taller but younger than those on the Christmas Knob site, indicating better site quality at Big Creek (this may also be suggested by the higher abundance of blackjack oak at Christmas Knob, sensu Johnson and Risser (1972)).
Location Trees ([m.sup.2]/ DBH DBH Species per ha ha (cm) (cm) Christmas Knob Post oak (Quercus stellata) 304 16.1 10.0 54.1 Blackjack oak (Q.
The most abundant tree was Plateau oak, followed by Ashe juniper, post and Texas oaks, scalybark oak and sycamore, and blackjack oak. The eighth species, cedar elm, was reported only as a motte on a survey line.
Two woodland points had only Plateau oak, one had Plateau oak and Ashe juniper, one had Plateau oak and blackjack oak, and the remaining point had post oak only.
A large, low-hanging limb on a large (41 cm dbh) blackjack oak was pushed against so hard that it broke, causing severe damage to the trunk.