black

(redirected from blackness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

black

1. of the colour of jet or carbon black, having no hue due to the absorption of all or nearly all incident light
2. Chess Draughts
a. a black or dark-coloured piece or square
b. the player playing with such pieces
3. a black ball in snooker, etc
4. (in roulette and other gambling games) one of two colours on which players may place even bets, the other being red
5. Archery a black ring on a target, between the outer and the blue, scoring three points

Black

1
1. Sir James (Whyte). born 1924, British biochemist. He discovered beta-blockers and drugs for peptic ulcers: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1988
2. Joseph. 1728--99, Scottish physician and chemist, noted for his pioneering work on carbon dioxide and heat

Black

2
Sometimes derogatory a member of a dark-skinned race, esp someone of Negroid or Australoid origin

black

a term used to refer to a variety of non-white ethnic groups. Black is a preferred form, especially among ethnic groups of African origins, reflecting a pride and identity in being black. The use of the term is associated with the rise of black political activism in the US in the 1960s, and is reflected in the slogan ‘Black is Beautiful’. Other terms to describe black people, such as coloured, Negro or Negress, are now generally considered offensive.

In the UK (and elsewhere), however, there is controversy about the use of the term to describe ‘non-white’ persons of Asian origin. Many Asians object to the use of the word ‘black’ to describe them and argue that this usage confuses the identity of a large number of very different ethnic groups such as Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Indians, West Indians, Africans and so on. The counter argument is that ‘non-white’ persons in the UK can be subject to DISCRIMINATION and institutionalized RACISM whatever their ethnic or national origins. In this sense, groups of both African and Asian origin share, to a significant extent, a common experience. See also BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, NEGRITUDE.

black

[blak]
(chemistry)
Fine particles of impure carbon that are made by the incomplete burning of carbon compounds, such as natural gas, naphthas, acetylene, bones, ivory, and vegetables.
(communications)
(optics)
Quality of an object which uniformly absorbs large percentages of light of all visible wavelengths.

black

Western color for mourning. [Christian Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 357]
See: Death

black

symbol of sin and badness. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]
See: Evil
References in periodicals archive ?
I think I'm probably of that school that wonders about how Blackness as a concept is historically defined in proximity to Whiteness and vice versa.
His attention to black writers' acoustic literary practices after Civil Rights offers salient heuristics for making sense of, to riff on Martin Heidegger, black being and time, which is to say the role of time in the social production of blackness (1962).
This brings me to my second thesis: Ironically, this fantasy of an alternative future--the same one that has drawn so many Black people to Black Panther and kept so many of us coming back to the film--is a fantasy about the erasure (or rather the ingenious evasion) of the very history that produced Blackness as we understand it, particularly in the United States.
in which the speaker's coming to black self-consciousness is predicated on an act of memory whereby he recalls the historical and social conditions of slavery and colonial oppression and thus demystifies the colonial stereotype of blackness as a figment of ideology" (Garraway 76).
Well that is exactly the story that Verda Byrd let's you in on in her journey of "Seventy Years of Blackness." Growing up as Verda Wagner she finds out that was not her name at all; her birth name was actually Jeanette Beagle.
Wright exposes the flaw(s) in employing a linear progress narrative and a Middle Passage epistemology to locate Blackness. She establishes Middle Passage epistemology as a "compelling narrative," useful in situating ancestry (Wright, 2015, p.
At the start of The Masque of Blackness, a vision greets Niger's daughters, explaining they must seek the bright sun "[w]ho forms all beauty with his sight" (B2v).
Visualisations of blackness are almost always imbued with political meaning, but Sherald presents the interior lives of her figures without editorialising about them.
In the process, she problematizes the Puerto Rican myth of racial democracy and reggaeton's perceived association in the popular imagination with either blackness or Latinidad.
(7) These materials, they argue, created a mask-like cosmetic effect of monotone blackness which would have been both unrealistic and flattening.
She said on ITV's Lorraine: "This depression hit me and I don't use the word depression lightly, this was a blackness where I would wake up.
In this song, whose author is unknown, the first element is the affirmation of blackness. This affirmation was very difficult to accept due to racism and the association of blackness with the ugliest and worst things in the world.