blackout


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blackout

1. a momentary loss of consciousness, vision, or memory
2. a temporary electrical power failure or cut
3. Electronics a temporary loss of sensitivity in a valve following a short strong pulse
4. a temporary loss of radio communications between a spacecraft and earth, esp on re-entry into the earth's atmosphere

blackout

[′blak‚au̇t]
(communications)
(electricity)
The shutting off of power in an electrical power transmission system, either deliberately or through failure of the system.

blackout

blackoutclick for a larger image
The relationship between acceleration and time at maximum G required to produce symptoms of grayout and blackout.
i. A condition of temporary loss of vision, possibly also loss of consciousness, resulting from the effect of high and sustained positive acceleration (g) on the body. A condition that occurs at g value higher than 1 that causes gray-out. Normally, this occurs when the body is exposed to +4 and +4.5 g for about 10 seconds or more. This can be postponed slightly by using a g-suit, by crouching, or by using a reclining seat. The onset of gray-out and blackout conditions varies from individual to individual. It is also dependent on physical conditioning.
ii. The fadeout of radio communications caused by changes in the ionosphere resulting from a nuclear explosion or ionospheric disturbances.
iii. An enforced period during which all lights in an area are turned off or concealed, so as not to be visible from the air. It is one of the passive air defense measures.

blackout

A complete loss of power. See brownout.
References in periodicals archive ?
But there's one thing on which most of them agree: "We will always have blackouts," says Hoff Stauffer, of Cambridge Energy Research Associates.
The notice must be provided by the plan administrator at least 30 days (but not more than 60 days) before the last date on which a participant could exercise the rights affected by the blackout period.
Blackouts were initially imposed in July after the worst drought in 50 years depleted the nation's hydroelectric reservoirs.
Lake testified that the rule was deemed no longer necessary, Noting that professional football is the sport primarily at issue when blackouts are the topic, he said its presence on broadcast television was contractually guaranteed through 2022 and the FCC had no reason to suspect that would change.
III) Telcos must show a list of blackout days for the existing calendar year on their individual websites, prior to the beginning of each calendar year and there must be area-wise circulation of the list, jointly with the tariff plans delivered by the telco, in every six month.
As mergers and acquisitions of systems take place, the configurations of the blackout policy could be impacted.
Memory blackouts refer to the inability to recall events; they do not refer to loss of consciousness as a result of drinking too much.
Gordon says that increasing strategic demand response participation from the current two percent to about 10 percent, would give the city much better tools to avert selective power failures, and full-scale blackouts.
Bush's national energy plan will prevent another massive blackout from happening again.
After the August 15th blackout descended on millions of Americans and Canadians in the northeast, former Clinton Energy Secretary (and current New Mexico Governor) Bill Richardson took to the airwaves to indict the free market for the catastrophe.
The enormous electrical blackout on Thursday, August 14, 2003 shut down just about everything--including air conditioning, air and rail travel, cellular and telephone access, and Internet services--in what's been referred to as the largest power blackout in history to hit the northeastern U.