blackwood

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blackwood,

name for several trees, especially an acaciaacacia
, any plant of the large leguminous genus Acacia, often thorny shrubs and trees of the family Leguminosae (pulse family). Chiefly of the tropics and subtropics, they are cultivated for decorative and economic purposes.
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Blackwood

Algernon (Henry). 1869--1951, British novelist and short- story writer; noted for his supernatural tales
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Other buyers included Idris Morris of the Fachell flock, who paid 11,000gns for another from the Blackwoods' pen.
Finkelstein's The House of Blackwood: Author-Publisher Relations in
Author Chase Blackwood, a veteran of both the US Army and Air Force, has released book 1 in his new fantasy series, The Kan Savasci Cycle.
Steven and Cindi Blackwood and their daughter Ariel.
Before Blackwoods: Scottish Journalism in the Age of Enlightenment, London: Pickering and Chatto.
In 1989, Blackwoods Beverages in Winnipeg bought the bottling plants (including Starlite) in western Canada, which were then amalgamated into PCCB (West) Ltd.
I wondered whether the more capacious "modernity" might more aptly delimit the temporal claims that are explored here than does "modernism," and whether Romanticists or Victorianists might not feel that the autonomizing forces of Blackwoods, the Cornhill, or the Germ are given too short shrift.
Lawrence (doug.lawrence@blackwoodsgroup.com), is President of Blackwoods Group LLC, Washington, D.C.
Thus, although the notion of racial difference is seen to justify what is perceived in Lord Jim as a universal human egotism, Englishness is subtly but consistently privileged over other nationalities, indirectly reaffirming colonial discourse in the novel and flattering the patriotic reader of Blackwoods Magazine where the novel was first serialized.
(36) Blackwoods Edingburgh Magazine, November 1831, 751.