bladderwort


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bladderwort

(blăd`ərwûrt', –wôrt'), any plant of the genus Utricularia, insectivorous or carnivorous aquatic plants, many native to North America. Small animals are caught and digested in bladderlike organs of the finely divided submerged leaves. Bladderworts and similar related genera are an important element of aquatic and marsh flora on all continents. They are sometimes grown in aquariums as curiosities. Bladderworts are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Scrophulariales, family Lentibulariaceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
This may explain the difference between bladderworts and junk-heavy species like corn and tobacco -- and humans.
bladderwort A carnivorous plant that lives in the water or wet soil.
On the whole, the researchers say their results indicate that bladderwort growth was not significantly affected by addition of nitrogen, but did benefit from carnivory.
2000) made comparisons between the surrounding plankton and the perifiton and demonstrated that the bladderworts do not trap the animals swimming in the open-water but those organisms staying as perifiton between and on the plants; also indicated that the prey composition from the bladders produces a partly image of environment, because to the presence of partly digestion organisms up to detritus indicate that a lot of organisms could not longer be determined and were therefore not counted.
Carnivorous bladderworts trap their prey with speed that would make a Bond villain shudder in gleeful envy.
And a water flea that bumbles into a little cup of a bladderwort likewise confronts the peril of touch-sensitive triggers.
A survey of bladderwort plants in the Everglades found far more bladders harboring living organisms than dead ones, reports Jennifer H.
Native Plant Society: Charlene Simpson will speak on carnivorous plants in the state, including varieties such as the cobra lily, sundews, bladderworts and butterworts, all found in the bogs and wetlands of Oregon.
These cousins of Audrey II are the pitcher plants (one species), sundews (three species and one hybrid), bladderworts (14 species), and butterworts (one species).
Other species, like bladderworts and puffer fish, also minimize genetic repeats.
18) In addition to this uncanny phenomenon, Irish bogs contain over eleven species of carnivorous plants, including sundews, butterworts, bladderworts and pitcher plants.