blade loading

blade loading

[′blād ‚lōd·iŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
A rotor's thrust in a rotary-wing aircraft divided by the total area of the rotor blades.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blade loading

blade loading
The ratio of the all-up weight of a helicopter to the total area of a rotor, excluding the disc area. It is the amount of the total weight each square foot of a helicopter rotor blade supports. Since blade area does not change, blade loading must be a constant in flight. Also called disc loading.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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References in periodicals archive ?
The mutual interactions between the two propellers result in unsteady periodic blade loading oscillations during one full rotation.
In addition, the blade loading and power distributions related to the cavitation at design flow rate were analyzed systematically.
The comparison of the wall skin friction, blade loading, and hub-to-shroud loading losses should be done for different operating scenarios such as design (rated) mass flow-rate, reduced (part-load) flow-rates, etc.
as a percentage of blade span or chord) and the blade loading (local pressure difference between blade pressure and suction surfaces).
As the axial compressor moves from the rated operating point to a near-stall operating point, the blade loading increases and the flow structures become stronger and unsteady.
(10.) Alheid, RJ, "Flexible Blade Coating Arrangement and Method with Compound Blade Loading." U.S.
Even though the fans are typically not operating during the period of normal train operation it is critical to give consideration to the blade loading cycles that results from the pressure pulses.
Since >75% of the power is developed at radii more than halfway to the tip, the useful blade loading can be approximated to a total circumferential force of 180kN distributed between the blades and acting at a radius of around 80m.
Examination of a few worn blades can identify the following items: uneven blade wear, holder or chamber alignment, blade contact angle, relative amount of blade loading pressure and presence of ink contamination.