blanket

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Related to blankets: Wool blankets

blanket,

sheet, usually of heavy woolen, or partly woolen, cloth, for use as a shawl, bed covering, or horse covering. The blanketmaking of primitive people is one of the finest remaining examples of early domestic artwork. The blankets of Mysore, India, were famous for their fine, soft texture. The loom of the Native American, though simple in construction, can produce blankets so closely woven as to be waterproof. The Navaho, Zuñi, Hopi, and other Southwestern Native Americans are noted for their distinctive, firmly woven blankets. The Navahos produced beautifully designed blankets characterized by geometrical designs woven with yarns colored with vegetable dyes. During the mid-19th cent. the Navahos began to use yarns imported from Europe, because of their brighter colors. The ceremonial Chilcat blanket of the Tlingit of the Northwest, generally woven with a warp of cedar bark and wool and a weft of goats' hair, was curved and fringed at the lower end. In the 20th cent., the electric blanket, with electric wiring between layers of fabric, gained wide popularity.
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blanket

[′blaŋ·kət]
(graphic arts)
In offset lithography, a rubber sheet covering the cylinder of an offset press that transfers the image from the plate to the paper.
(mining engineering)
A textile material used in ore treatment plants for catching coarse free gold and sometimes associated minerals, for example, pyrite.
(nucleonics)
A layer of fertile uranium-238 or thorium-232 material placed around or within the core of a nuclear reactor to breed new fuel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blanket

Physics a layer of a fertile substance placed round the core of a nuclear reactor as a reflector or absorber and often to breed new fissionable fuel
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

offset press

A printer that uses an intermediate rubber-coated cylinder known as a "blanket" to transfer the image onto the paper. Instead of transferring the image from a metallic drum onto paper as is done with most digital printers, the image is "offset" onto the blanket and then to paper. The blanket creates a smoother image on most types of paper and can print on rough or heavy stock as well as other media. Most offset presses use this lithographic method.

Sheet Fed and Web Fed
Sheet-fed offset printers use cut sheets of paper, whereas web-fed printers use rolls of paper that are cut and trimmed after printing. The web-based offset method is typically used for high-speed, high-volume applications such as printing newspapers and magazines.

Right Reading to Wrong Reading
Since offset presses use the intermediate blanket as the transfer mechanism, the original negative image on the drum is right-reading. It becomes wrong-reading on the blanket and then back to the original on the paper.

Combination Offset and Laser
Indigo USA, Woburn, MA (www.indigonet.com), which was acquired by HP in 2002, combines laser printing and offset printing. It makes a "digital offset color press," which is an electrophotographic printer that offsets to a blanket instead of imaging directly from the drum. It also uses a special liquid toner instead of dry toner, enabling it to print on polyester, PVC, films and other media as well as coated and uncoated paper. See lithography, digital printing, right-reading and DI press.


Offset and Digital, Too
HP Indigo's "digital offset color presses" are digital printers that use a blanket to image the pages instead of directly from the drum. Combined with its Electroink dry toner, Indigo printers can print on a wide variety of substrates. (Image courtesy of Hewlett-Packard Company.)
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References in classic literature ?
The Swede, after explaining in his gruff way that the huts were doubtless filthy and vermin-ridden, spread Jane's blankets on the ground for her, and at a little distance unrolled his own and lay down to sleep.
As she debated the wisdom of risking disturbing the child's slumber by lifting the blanket that now protected its face from the sun, she noted that the cook conversed with the chief in the language of the Negro.
The calm and control which were so much a part of her seemed to have been communicated to the blankets, so that I was aware of a soft dreaminess and content, and of an oval face and brown eyes framed in a fisherman's cap and tossing against a background now of grey cloud, now of grey sea, and then I was aware that I had been asleep.
I was compelled to let go the sheet while I helped her to the nest of blankets and chafed her hands and arms.
Billy sat up in the blankets once more, passing one arm around Saxon, who had also sat up.
"Nature has made an impenetrable barrier on this side," he continued, pointing down the perpendicular declivity into the dark current before he dropped the blanket; "and as you know that good men and true are on guard in front I see no reason why the advice of our honest host should be disregarded.
He roughly divided the gold in halves, caching one half on a prominent ledge, wrapped in a piece of blanket, and returning the other half to the sack.
Daylight was yet three hours away, though it was already six o'clock; and in the darkness Henry went about preparing breakfast, while Bill rolled the blankets and made the sled ready for lashing.
With a conciliating, apologetic bob of his tail, he trotted on up wind and came upon Skipper on his back, rolled in a blanket so that only his head stuck out, and sound asleep.
I believe it's a mouse," he thought, "that's the veal I left on the table." He felt fearfully disinclined to pull off the blanket, get up, get cold, but all at once something unpleasant ran over his leg again.
Tod's bed, curled up under the blanket.--"He has gone to bed in his boots," whispered Peter.
At this moment the draught took effect, and the poor squire began to discharge both ways at such a rate that the rush mat on which he had thrown himself and the canvas blanket he had covering him were fit for nothing afterwards.