blank

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blank

1. a plate or plug used to seal an aperture
2. a piece of material prepared for stamping, punching, forging, etc
3. Archery the white spot in the centre of a target

blank

[blaŋk]
(analytical chemistry)
In a chemical analysis, the measured value that is obtained in the absence of a specified component of a sample and that reflects contamination from sources external to the component; it is deducted from the value obtained when the test is performed with the specified component present. Also known as analytical blank.
(design engineering)
(electronics)
To cut off the electron beam of a television picture tube, camera tube, or cathode-ray oscilloscope tube during the process of retrace by applying a rectangular pulse voltage to the grid or cathode during each retrace interval. Also known as beam blank.
(engineering)
The result of the final cutting operation on a natural crystal.
(metallurgy)
A semifinished piece of metal to be stamped or forged into a tool or implement.
A semifinished, pressed, compacted mass of powdered metal.
Metal sheet prepared for a forming operation.
(ordnance)
Ammunition which contains no projectile but which does contain a charge of low explosive, such as black powder, to produce a noise.
References in periodicals archive ?
This notion of action envisions it not as an immediate effect of reading--because this activity is made anything but easier--but as a delayed effect of the blankness of the story.
Whereas Denslow's zigzagging vitality embodied horizontal range, her squeezed verticality brings poppies teetering to crowd Baum's voyagers with a blankness that could kill.
But really, ``Marie Antoinette'' is simply a movie about the beauty that can be found in blankness.
I've been in offices--insurance companies, title companies--and felt this terrible weight of blankness and despair.
This 'nothing' however, is not nihilistic blankness, but the vibrant, potent matrix of all phenomena, ourselves included.
My wife and I have not been blessed with a child, but I couldn't imagine the horror of watching a child wither away--or perhaps worse, linger in the blankness of coma.
Not a single smile flickered across the Royal coupon anyway as she gazed in blankness at the proceedings unfolding before her in the Scottish Parliament yesterday.
At night they will also cut out the blankness of the dark sky and create a warmer feel.
As that first headline scrolled by, I remember the blankness of the old "green screen" online world.
I always feel an acute sense of loss when I reach the last page of a book, blankness.
Gene discovers passionate, emotional heights along with loyalty and friendship; he discovers corresponding depths of insecurity and anxiety; the guilt and shame of betrayal; and the blankness of loss.
There is, first of all--to list the cliches in order--the textbook statement regarding period and chronology: the North German tribes who invaded post-Roman Britain (in numbers we still have not established for certain) fall into the historiographical murk, or relative blankness, of the "Dark Ages," and so our data on society and economy (and slavery's position) are not likely to be plentiful or even apparent.