blast effect


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blast effect

[′blast i′fekt]
(physics)
Violent air movements and pressure changes and the destruction or damage resulting therefrom, generally caused by an explosion on or above the surface of the earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The objective of this is identification of possibilities and procedures of safety for buildings against terrorist attacks and confronting with blast effects. With regard to variety of shapes used by designers in their plans, there is a problem that to deal with terrorist attacks, what shapes of building are more resistant and stable against explosion effects (given constant pre-assumptions e.g.
Its effects, although not unimportant, are relatively minor compared with the blast effects, thermal flash, initial nuclear radiation, and local fallout.
According to a shot list, reel #11010 included, for example: "School, deaf and dumb, blast effect, damaged Commercial school demolished School, engineering, demolished.School, Shirayama elementary, demolished, blast effect Tenements, demolished."
One terrorism expert said the plot would probably fail because huge amounts of explosives and a detailed knowledge of blast effect would be necessary.
One night, during the war, the Birchgrove areas was straddled by a number of parachute mines, which exploded with a blast effect.
When a Special Forces A Team or a field team can call on a B-52 or a B-1 at 38,000 to 41,000 feet with 2,000-pound class weapons and in real time discuss notions of fusing and blast effect and be able to deliver those, what an amazing capability.
Scores of thousands of rockets ( each with the blast effect of a six-inch shell ( set up a loud, continuous rumbling noise, above which the sharp crack of the four-inch guns near us could only just be heard.
The RPG struck the HMMWV just behind the driver's door and its blast effect traversed the rear of the vehicle, exiting near the right rear tailgate.
Number one on the list is intense, intermittent sun exposure--a "blast effect." The "blast effect" damages the skin of people who receive a blast of ultraviolet light on the weekend, often during weekend sporting activities.
The twelve-kiloton Hiroshima weapon had had a blast effect alone equivalent to some twenty-five million pounds of TNT--that's million.
He figured the blast effect of the blanks probably bruised him, and told the doctor so.
One is the blast effect that radiates the air, and this can cause horrendous injuries, particularly burns.