injury

(redirected from blast injury)
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injury

Law a violation or infringement of another person's rights that causes him harm and is actionable at law

injury

[′in·jə·rē]
(medicine)
A structural or functional stress or trauma that induces a pathologic process.
Damage resulting from the stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Declarador said the campaign of the government against firecrackers and the bad weather due to tropical storm 'Agaton' contributed to the zero incident of blast injury.
Blast injury due to improvised explosive devices was the representative injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
also observed IED blast injury to be the most frequent cause with gradual increase over time; 71% in 1965 to 76% in 1971.
Explosions result in four different types of injury which comprise primary injury (overpressure or implosion injury as a result of blast wave), secondary injury (caused by projectiles from primary bomb fragments or secondary fragments), tertiary injury (caused by whole body translocation due to blast wave energy) and quaternary blast injury (due to fire and heat generated from explosion)7.
Dismounted complex blast injury report of the army dismounted complex blast injury task force.
The American veteran's lawyer, Saeed Al Gelani, told Dubai Court of Appeal that his client was still suffering pain from a bomb blast injury he sustained during the first Gulf War while fighting Saddam Hussein's forces in Kuwait.
A primary blast injury occurs as the shock front and the overpressure blast wave move through the body.
Angus Scrimgeour, who has been investigating the effects of low zinc diets on cell stress following a blast injury.
According to Professor Anthony Bull, head of the Royal British Legion-sponsored Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London, the conflict in Afghanistan changed the way that engineers and medical staff worked together to gain a better understanding of unusual blast conditions and the injuries they caused.
Since the victims were, on average, more than four years removed from their injuries, the results suggest the presence of a long-term impact of blast injury on the brain.
Not surprisingly, blast injury to the ear has emerged among deployed military personnel [11-12].
In all, 88 patients had penetrating head injury, of whom 45 (51%) had a secondary diagnosis of blast injury; and 34 patients had a closed head injury, of whom 15 (44%) had a secondary diagnosis of blast injury.