blast

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blast

1. 
a. the rapid movement of air away from the centre of an explosion, combustion of rocket fuel, etc
b. a wave of overpressure caused by an explosion; shock wave
2. any of several diseases of plants and animals, esp one producing withering in plants

Blast

 

blasting, supplying air or other gases in industrial heat engineering plants in order to ensure or intensify the physicochemical processes taking place in them. The gas is compressed and supplied by means of blowers and compressors. There are two types of blast: cold blast, in which ordinary air is supplied, and hot blast, in which air is preheated to 1100°-1200°C. The substitution of a hot blast for a cold blast in metallurgy has increased the productivity of furnaces.

Blasts with a constant moisture content, which eliminates the adverse effect of moisture variations in ordinary air on smelting conditions, appeared in the 1940’s. Blasts enriched with oxygen to increase the rate of the smelting process began to be widely used in the 1960’s. The highest blast flow rate is characteristic of blast furnaces in which the average amount of gas supplied is 2 m3/min per cu m of furnace working volume (in modern blast furnaces, 6,000–7,000 m3/min, under a pressure of 0.3–0.5 meganewtons per sq m [MN/m2]). The simultaneous supply to the furnace of oxygen-enriched air and of natural gas not only increases the productivity but also reduces the consumption of coke. An oxygen blast supplied from above at a pressure of 0.9–1.5 MN/m2 and a rate of 300–800 m3/min is used in converter production.

blast

[blast]
(computer science)
To release internal or external memory areas from the control of a computer program in the course of dynamic storage allocation, making these areas available for reallocation to other programs.
(engineering)
The setting off of a heavy explosive charge.
(physics)
The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure, followed by a sudden decrease, that results from this movement, differentiated from less rapid pressure changes.

blast

i. The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
ii. The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure followed by a sudden decrease that results from this movement, differentiated from less-rapid pressure changes.

blast

(1)
BLT, used especially for large data sends over a network or comm line. Opposite of snarf. Usage: uncommon. The variant "blat" has been reported.

blast

(2)
[HP/Apollo] Synonymous with nuke. Sometimes the message "Unable to kill all processes. Blast them (y/n)?" would appear in the command window upon logout.
References in periodicals archive ?
To celebrate the arrival of Blast Off in Coventry, Toys R Us are offering readers the chance to win some great prizes.
Astronauts Robert Crippen (left) and John Young wave as they leave their training base for Cape Canaveral - and tomorrow's blast off abeard the US space shuttle.
Unlike NASA shuttles, SpaceShipOne didn't use rockets to blast off from the ground.
The first manned commercial mission to space will blast off on June 2.
Metallic glasses may blast off now that sonochemistry promises an easy way to make them.
The open day was also an opportunity for Thinktank to launch its new Blast Off exhibition looking at space and space travel.
The Rosetta craft had been due to blast off from the European Space Agency's launch centre on the edge of the jungle in Kourou, French Guyana on Thursday morning but bad weather halted the countdown.
But the fossil hunt won't begin until 2013, when a NASA robot probe should blast off and return with rock samples two or three years later.
The 60-year-old US businessman has paid Russia pounds 14million to blast off in one of their Soyuz rockets.