blast pressure

blast pressure

[′blast ‚presh·ər]
(physics)
The impact pressure of the air set in motion by an explosion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
color screen and digital controls allow for programmable and password-protected job recipes with selected particle size, blast pressure and feed rate (up to 4 lb/min).
Because there are competing theories for how blast pressure causes brain injury, the Army has begun to gather data concerning blast exposure using blast gauges.
At PS3, the measured shock wave speed increased with blast pressure and was close to the calculated theoretical shock wave speed based on one-dimensional shock tube theory [Figure 3]c.
Steve Wilson, Director of Global Business Development for Cold Jet said, "The contaminant on this sample required a little less pressure than the uncoated sample of PBLT-75 that we also tested, but could be dialed in to clean quite nicely." He added, "The blast pressure was on the very low end of the process capabilities.
The imparted blast pressure was calculated by AT-Blast software and shown in Table 8.
The ASCE specifications [5] have also presented guidance on how to characterize the blast pressure in the design of structures in petrochemical facilities.
The release surfaces should be light, to be easily pushed aside by the propagating blast wave, or fragile, to instantly fail under the blast pressure. To prevent people's injury from the potential fragments of the failed opening, the release surfaces are often located at the roof of the structure.
Possible differences between finite element analysis results and experimental observations are due to laboratory errors and equipment failure under blast pressure, assumptions of homogeneity of materials, lack of accurate estimation of explosion loads on the structures, and the difference between the actual mechanism of interaction between steel reinforcing bars and concrete.
In response, producers have come up with "super-fracking" which increases the blast pressure, recovers more oil or gas and lowers production unit costs.
Perhaps a more scientific approach is required here by first incorporating blast pressure sensors, correlate vehicle damage to blast sensor readings, and use that data in a similar study.
A "quiet" .22 can be over 130 dBC, and the higher the operating pressure (and thus muzzle blast pressure) the higher the dB, running up near 170 dBC.