blasting


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Related to blasting: Explosives, Sand blasting, Grit blasting

blasting,

shattering, breaking, or splitting of rock or other material by the discharge of an explosiveexplosive,
substance that undergoes decomposition or combustion with great rapidity, evolving much heat and producing a large volume of gas. The reaction products fill a much greater volume than that occupied by the original material and exert an enormous pressure, which can be
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 placed within or in contact with it. It is a necessary part of many engineering operations. An ancient method of breaking rock consisted of heating the rock by fire and then pouring water on it, the sudden contraction resulting in shattering or cleavage. Modern methods of blasting involve four operations: drilling the holes to receive the charge, placing it, stemming the hole (i.e., filling the hole above the charge with earth or clay), and igniting or detonating the charge. The location, size, and number of holes drilled depend upon local conditions and the nature of the work. The holes vary from 1 to 3 in. (3–8 cm) in diameter and from a few inches up to 20 ft (6 m) or more in depth. The charge is made up of some explosive, such as dynamite or ammonium nitrate; black powder, the oldest known explosive, is rarely used today. Multiple charges are sometimes set off, either simultaneously or in sequence.

Blasting

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A medieval term for the interference with the fertility of crops, humans, and animals, by witches. If a farmer suffered a poor harvest, he might well blame it on a witch for "blasting" his crops. If a woman miscarried, she might claim she had been blasted. It was said that the spell for blasting included the flaying of a cat, lizard, snake, or toad, then reducing the skin to ashes over a fire made of yew, hawthorn, and elder. The ashes were scattered over the farmer's fields or sprinkled on the threshold of his house.

In fact, true Witches are very pro-life and work for fertility, not against it. But this was part of the propaganda of the early Church, a reversal of true pagan ways to make them appear negative. In the Malleus Malleficarum (1486), the second of its three parts deals with a number of sexual matters (with which the inquisitors seemed especially fascinated), including the methods used by witches to dull the powers of generation and obstruct the sex act. It also deals with how they cause the male organ to disappear, how they kill a child in the womb, and how they injure cattle and raise storms.

The two monks who wrote the Malleus Malleficarum were quite specific when it came to descriptions of these acts: "Intrinsically they cause (obstruction of the procreant function) in two ways. First, when they directly prevent the erection of the member which is accommodated to fructification. And this need not seem impossible, when it is considered that they are able to vitiate the natural use of any member. Secondly, when they prevent the flow of the vital essences to the members in which resides the motive force, closing up the seminal ducts so that it does not reach the generative vessels, or so that it cannot be ejaculated, or is fruitlessly spilled."

But blasting could also be done with the evil eye, by the witch just looking at the person or thing and muttering a curse. Charges of blasting were frequently made against witches and, as with so many false charges, were almost impossible to disprove.

blasting

[′blas·tiŋ]
(engineering)
Cleaning materials by a blast of air that blows small abrasive particles against the surface.
The act of detonating an explosive.
(geology)
Abrasion caused by movement of fine particles against a stationary fragment.

blasting

Using explosives to loosen rock or other closely packed materials.
References in classic literature ?
The very fact, as Perry took pains to explain, of the blasting of several very exact and learned scientific hypotheses made it apparent that we could not know what lay before us within the bowels of the earth, and so we might continue to hope for the best, at least until we were dead--when hope would no longer be essential to our happiness.
And the first surprise came very soon, when the explosives (to which he owed his sudden chance of engagement)--dynamite in cases and blasting powder in barrels--taken on board, main hatch battened for sea, cook restored to his functions in the galley, anchor fished and the tug ahead, rounding the South Foreland, and with the sun sinking clear and red down the purple vista of the channel, he went on the poop, on duty, it is true, but with time to take the first freer breath in the busy day of departure.
The cliff was not in the way or anything; but this objectless blasting was all the work going on.
And, perhaps," he cried, with a blasting sneer, "perhaps he was also thinking of leaving all his money to your church.
It was strange enough, in the silence of midnight, and the dead stillness that seemed to be created by the sudden and unexpected stoppage of the engine which had been clanking and blasting in our ears incessantly for so many days, to watch the look of blank astonishment expressed in every face: beginning with the officers, tracing it through all the passengers, and descending to the very stokers and furnacemen, who emerged from below, one by one, and clustered together in a smoky group about the hatchway of the engine-room, comparing notes in whispers.
If you could get a bag of blasting powder at the front door with a slow match to it--"
The factory assembles a new generation of high-tech printed circuit boards and microchips, which form the heart and brain of an advanced electronic initiator technology used for innovative new detonators as part of a high-performance blasting system for mines.
Several of the foundries that reported using silica sand also cited the complete cleaning capability and the mold "texture" produced by sand blasting as essential for proper mold coating adhesion.
Additionally, Parks wants the 2,000-foot limit to be imposed on all future developments that might require blasting.
Ice Blasting, by comparison, uses only eight gallons of water per hour of operation, produces no dust or particulate contamination, and has set new standards for cleanliness and product reliability.
Components index through separate entry, blasting and airwash within the cabinet before returning to the front load/unload position.
Crews were planning another blasting attempt, but little hope was held out of finding anyone alive.