onomatopoeia

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onomatopoeia

(ŏn'əmăt'əpē`ə) [Gr.,=word-making], in language, the representation of a sound by an imitation thereof; e.g., the cat mews. Poets often convey the meaning of a verse through its very sound. For example, in "Song of the Lotus-Eaters" Tennyson indicates the slow, sensuous, and langorous life of the Lotus-Eaters by the sound of the words he uses to describe the land in which they live:
Here are cool mosses deep,
And through the moss the ivies creep,
And in the stream the long-leaved flowers weep,
And from the craggy ledge the poppy hangs in sleep.
Onomatopoeia can also represent harsh and unpleasant sounds, as in Browning's "Meeting at Night":
A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Onomatopoeia

(pop culture)
The black trench coat–wearing assassin Onomatopoeia hurled onto the pages of a Kevin Smith–penned, Phil Hester and Ande Parks–illustrated story in Green Arrow vol. 3 #11 (2002). Introduced as a ninja-like murderer of third-string superheroes such as the suburban vigilante Buckeye, Onomatopoeia struck a more well-known superhero, the contemporary Green Arrow, Connor Hawke—an accomplished martial artist himself and son of the original Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. Like his name implies, Onomatopoeia's calling card is that he utters onomatopoeic words—specifically, the sound of the murder weapon he employs during the murder (“Bang!” “Crash!”)—just before killing his next victim. While he didn't quite execute Green Arrow, he did manage to hospitalize him by shooting him in the head. As Green Arrow's arch-nemesis—and by extension, his father's, as the two Emerald Archers fight crime together in Star City—little is known about this evasive, verbally limited supervillain. His face concealed behind a black mask with concentric bull's-eye markings, Onomatopoeia has superpowers that mimic a super–serial killer. He is adept at using guns, swords, knives, and other weaponry, and even goes to such extremes as to bite weapons in two! With behavior that borders on psychotic, the mysterious Onomatopoeia might find a welcome home in the bleaker post–Infinite Crisis (2005–2006) DC Universe.
The Supervillain Book: The Evil Side of Comics and Hollywood © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Onomatopoeia

 

in linguistics, sound-imitative words that develop out of a phonetic similarity to combinations of nonverbal sounds—for example, Russian miaukat’, “to meow” (from miau, “meow”). The term “onomatopoeia” also refers to the method by which sound-imitative words are formed, as well as to a particular type of onomatopoeic, or reduplicative, word. Often, “onomatopoeia” designates the conventional verbal imitation of the sound associated with a living or nonliving thing (ku-ku, “cuckoo”; bum-bum, “boom-boom”; a devitsa—khi-khi-khi! da kha-kha-kha! “And the girl goes ‘Hee, hee, hee!’ and ‘Ha, ha, ha!’ “). Onomatopoeia is used in poetry to create an image based on sound:

Budu akat’, budu okat’,
Kapliu-step’ voz’mu pod lokot’,
Kon’ poidet podkovoi tsokat’,
Ekat’ selezenkoiu. (A. Tarkovskii) 
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

onomatopoeia

1. the formation of words whose sound is imitative of the sound of the noise or action designated, such as hiss, buzz, and bang
2. the use of such words for poetic or rhetorical effect
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
A strong ewe-lamb bond is necessary to facilitate suckling and ongoing care of the lamb, and appropriate behaviours including grooming, standing, sucking and bleating by ewes and lambs in the first few hours after birth are needed to develop this bond [18].
Even before houses were built on the land behind our back fence, we no longer saw the grazing carabao and the bleating goat.
Patna: In a rare incident, the bleating of goats led to the arrest of two thieves in Bihar on Friday.
A two years old non-descript doe was brought with complaint of anorexia, bleating, head pressing against the wall and circling movement since last one month.
To PETA and the like, I will say this: the National is here to stay and all the bleating will not get it stopped as you would wish.
Maybe he could tell people in the food bank queue to stop bleating, too.
"It is time for Sir Richard to stop bleating and using hype but be honest and say we ran it badly and deserved to lose."
He had seen me and proceeded straight up the hill, bleating as he came, to stand beside me, obviously seeking simple nonspecific companionship--I guessed he was a castaway.
It comes with a silencer cap to prevent bleating in your pack or pocket.
THE vile woman caught urinating on a war memorial and performing a sex act beside it yesterday issued a bleating "apology".
Close your ears to bleating from the Premier League.
I seem to remember insurers bleating and whingeing about how much the hurricane damage in the South of England and the Pacific tsunami had cost them and how, naturally, all our premiums had to go up.