bleeding canker

bleeding canker

[′blēd·iŋ ¦kaŋ·kər]
(plant pathology)
A fungus disease of hardwoods caused by Phytophthora cactorum and characterized by cankers which exude a reddish ooze on the trunk and branches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Staff at Dunecht Estates cut down trees beside the A944 near Loch of Skene after they contracted bleeding canker disease.
replaced due scale of the from insect Dr While the leaf miner caterpillar does not kill the tree, it weakens it and makes it vulnerable to other diseases, in particular bleeding canker, which can be fatal.
Cardiff council said the trees in question were suffering from bacterial bleeding canker and will be replaced with 10ft trees once the works are completed.
More than half our horse Jackson chestnuts have potentially deadly bleeding canker which causes sticky trunk lesions.
"While the leaf miner does not kill trees, there is a serious bleeding canker disease that does.
Ken Simons, Warwickshire County Council's forestry officer, said: "The wet start to the year has had a severe impact and this is coupled with many of our common horse chestnuts suffering attacks from a range of pests and diseases, namely bacterial bleeding canker, leaf miner and leaf blotch.
Advice on the government's Defra website says: "There is no chemical treatment currently available to cure or arrest the development of bleeding canker.
In recent years a number of devastating problems have hit our chestnuts including a Bleeding Canker that gradually kills the tree, a scale insect that spreads rapidly and a leaf miner that has come to us from Southern Europe over the last 8 years.
A tree disease known as Phytopthora (or bleeding canker) is rampaging through the West Country and the chestnut avenue is its latest victim.
Half the species' estimated one million trees could already be infected with a condition known as bleeding canker.
They also say the trees being removed are suffering from bacterial bleeding canker and will be replaced.