blind landing


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blind landing

[¦blīnd ′lan·diŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
Landing an aircraft solely by the use of instruments because of poor visibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
The real work was done by the ground controller, who passed instructions on to the pilot via radio, meaning that the intense training for a blind landing was restricted to a few ground controllers, freeing the pilots to follow their own work without any additional burden.
This is because the version of blind landing preferred by the airlines and professional pilots kept control of the landing--of the aircraft--in the cockpit, while the ground-controlled approach placed the skill for that job largely on the ground.
While back in its earliest days (before WWII), it was considered a blind landing system, now anyone not flying for dollars or Euros will see a 200-foot minimum or a little more above the runway approach-end area--a.k.a.
White has said he will attempt his new move in the final -- the Double McTwist 1260, which is a double backward flip with three and a half revolutions ending in a blind landing.
Blind landings; low visibility operations in American aviation, 1918-1958.
The airport has won the approval of the UK Civil Aviation Authority for "blind landings" by instrument from either end of the main runway.
The Airports Authority of India is installing new equipment for so-called Category III blind landings at the Indira Gandhi Airport in Delhi.