blind

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blind

1. done without being able to see, relying on instruments for information
2. (of cultivated plants) having failed to produce flowers or fruits
3. Poker a stake put up by a player before he examines his cards
4. Hunting chiefly US and Canadian a screen of brush or undergrowth, in which hunters hide to shoot their quarry
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Blind

A device to obstruct vision or keep out light, consisting of a shade, screen, or an assemblage of panels or slats.

blind

[blīnd]
(engineering)
A solid disk inserted at a pipe joint or union to prevent the flow of fluids through the pipe; used during maintenance and repair work as a safety precaution. Also known as blank.
(geology)
Referring to a mineral deposit with no surface outcrop.

blind

1. A device to obstruct vision or keep out light; usually a shade, a screen, or an assemblage of light panels or slats.
2. A solid disk inserted in a pipe joint or union to prevent the flow of water during the repair of a water distribution system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysis of that politics reveals the agency of these blinded and paralyzed veterans in fashioning relations with the state that fused a recognition of the need for state assistance with a frequently repeated desire for self-sufficiency.
The BVA's program also combined self-help, independent mobility, and public support, but it began with a pronounced emphasis on the necessity for a tightly bonded solidarity among all blinded veterans that was often expressed in quasimilitary, highly gendered language.
The BVA's formulation of aggressive normalization involved the commitment to separate blinded veterans from the fate of the civilian blind, as the veterans understood it, and to avoid the dependence on the state or any other institution that sapped individual initiative.
Just as paralyzed Canadian veterans who founded the CPA opted to use the potentially stigmatizing wheelchair, because of its convenience and the independence it afforded, the blinded veterans of the early BVA opted for the white cane for the same reason.
It called for government subsidies for the publication of taped "talking books," because many men lacked the finger sensitivity to master braille, and because too little was published in braille for the blind to be exposed to a full range of the literature of current events and cultural trends that would enable blinded veterans to know the world around them.
The blinded American veterans of World War II and the Korean War led rich and active lives.