blind

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blind

1. done without being able to see, relying on instruments for information
2. (of cultivated plants) having failed to produce flowers or fruits
3. Poker a stake put up by a player before he examines his cards
4. Hunting chiefly US and Canadian a screen of brush or undergrowth, in which hunters hide to shoot their quarry
www.eyecarefoundation.org

Blind

A device to obstruct vision or keep out light, consisting of a shade, screen, or an assemblage of panels or slats.

blind

[blīnd]
(engineering)
A solid disk inserted at a pipe joint or union to prevent the flow of fluids through the pipe; used during maintenance and repair work as a safety precaution. Also known as blank.
(geology)
Referring to a mineral deposit with no surface outcrop.

blind

1. A device to obstruct vision or keep out light; usually a shade, a screen, or an assemblage of light panels or slats.
2. A solid disk inserted in a pipe joint or union to prevent the flow of water during the repair of a water distribution system.
References in periodicals archive ?
A NEW beer has been brewed to raise a glass to Birmingham's Peaky Blinders.
All of the bar staff in The Peaky Blinders, in Dale End, in the city centre, wear the distinctive caps sported by Tommy Shelby and his gang.
Additionally, it's unclear how Blinder comes up with the calculation that household debt reached 140 percent of gross domestic product-he cites not one source for that number, which makes it difficult to agree with his conclusions.
Eighty percent of the CDS, Blinder says, were "naked CDS"--pure gambling contracts where the party insured didn't have any sort of "insurable interest" (ownership or other connection) in the item being insured.
In After the Music Stopped, Blinder runs into the same problem the government faced when trying to explain what was going on in the panicky days of 2008: the financial system has become so complicated and technical that it takes a whole lot of work to understand exactly how we got into this mess.
Blinder argues that this transformation will happen more rapidly than workers will be able to adjust to it; so fast, in fact, that we should expect offshoring to be "one of the biggest political issues in economics over the next generation.
Blinder is also Vice Chairman of the Promontory Interfinancial Network, an organization founded by bank industry leaders to provide a network of over 2000 financial institutions with profit-enhancing solutions.
Blinder praised Fed policymakers for their response to the market turmoil, namely the discount rate cut and injection of ample liquidity into the money market, but urged them to guard against downside risks.
As to what the central bank should reveal, Blinder lists the following: the goals of monetary policy; the methods of analysis; the decision making models; and immediate disclosure of decisions and votes, accompanied by a "balance of risks" statement.
Possibly uncomfortable with this implication, Blinder notes that his question may be unclear about whether rival firms would also reduce their prices.
Greenspan, McDonough, Blinder, Hoenig, Kelley, Lindsey, Melzer, Ms.
His likely successor is Alan Blinder, whom Clinton recently appointed vice chairman of the Fed.