blinking


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

blinking

[′bliŋ·kiŋ]
(communications)
Method of providing information in pulse systems by modifying the signal at its source so that signal presentation on the display scope alternately appears and disappears; in loran, this indicates that a station is malfunctioning.
(electronics)
Electronic-countermeasures technique employed by two aircraft separated by a short distance and within the same azimuth resolution so as to appear as one target to a tracking radar; the two aircraft alternately spot-jam, causing the radar system to oscillate from one place to another, making an accurate solution of a fire control problem impossible.
(navigation)
Regular shifting right and left or alternate appearance and disappearance of a loran signal to indicate that the signals of a pair of stations are out of synchronization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enter the blinking eye-on-a-chip: an artificial human eye replica constructed in the laboratory of Penn Engineering researchers.
The researchers based their system on complementary sequences of DNA that come together to link a fluorophore with a target biomolecule and then fall apart again, generating a blinking fluorescent signal.
This affects the dataset fed into the neural network and is likely to result in a different blinking rate or no blinking at all.
During the illusion Teller carried out several "secret actions", which were found to coincide with participants blinking.
Klamm and Tarnow also recommend blinking often, closing the lids completely, and taking short breaks by looking about 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds every 20 minutes.
All subjects are instructed to track the circular cursor with their eyes, no matter whether it is moving or static, with their bodies (and especially their heads) still and their eyes blinking naturally.
They reduce blinking not only literally, in time, but also space and other dimensions such as channel availability.
The latest Better Shooting column talks about the importance on not blinking. Easier said than done!
A SINGLE mother who is almost completely paralysed by locked-in syndrome has completed a degree by blinking.
Motor tics often involve musculature in the face and the neck, such as eye blinking or head shaking, and vocal tics vary from throat clearing and coughing to more complex variants like coprolalia--involuntary swearing or uttering obscene words [2].
Simultaneously, the researchers moved the same hand closer and closer to the subjects' faces and measured the amount of blinking that ensued.
So it turns out there's more--lots more--to blinking than meets the eye.