blinking


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blinking

[′bliŋ·kiŋ]
(communications)
Method of providing information in pulse systems by modifying the signal at its source so that signal presentation on the display scope alternately appears and disappears; in loran, this indicates that a station is malfunctioning.
(electronics)
Electronic-countermeasures technique employed by two aircraft separated by a short distance and within the same azimuth resolution so as to appear as one target to a tracking radar; the two aircraft alternately spot-jam, causing the radar system to oscillate from one place to another, making an accurate solution of a fire control problem impossible.
(navigation)
Regular shifting right and left or alternate appearance and disappearance of a loran signal to indicate that the signals of a pair of stations are out of synchronization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it is brief, blinking creates an interruption in our visual perception.
By comparison, if you can shoot at all, blinking won't hurt your accuracy.
The competition was devised by Jeanne Macdonald, from Tynemouth, who set up Blinking Eye Publishing after graduating from the MA course in creative writing at Newcastle University.
The London team used brain scanners to study the effects of blinking in volunteers.
The team found the areas that turn off during blinking are the visual cortex, which is responsible for seeing, plus the parietal and prefrontal areas - active when a person is conscious of what is happening around them.
The Effect of Different Activities on Blinking Type of Activity Blinks Per Minute Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Average Reading a Book 9 8 7 Staring at a Computer Screen 7 6 8 Talking with a Classmate 10 12 11 Cooling in Front of a Fan 23 20 20
The blinking happens more often if the laser light is intense.
Blinking is a reflex, something our bodies do automatically.
Someone - identity withheld by city officials - has made several complaints since Thanksgiving about merchants with blinking, twinkling and flashing lights.
More than a mere physiological function, blinking may serve as a sort of "mental punctuation" that indicates whether you are alert, concentrating, bored, or anxious.
I mean, if you had some law official shining a spotlight in your face every other night as a young volunteer your blinking would go up the left too.
6 seconds, while his co-presenter Fiona McDiarmid is nearer normal levels, blinking every 2.