blistering


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blistering

[′blis·tə·riŋ]
(engineering)
The appearance of enclosed or broken macroscopic cavities in a body or in a glaze or other coating during firing.

blistering

1. Small blisters, bubbles, or bulges in a plaster finish coat; results from applying a finish coat over too damp a base coat, or from troweling on plaster too soon; also called turtleback.
2. See blister.
3. The irregular raising of a thin layer at the surface of placed mortar or concrete during or soon after completion of the finishing operation, or, in the case of pipe, after spinning.
4. In the firing of a ceramic, the development of enclosed or broken macroscopic vesicles or bubbles in a body or glaze or other coating.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is essential to have a systemic approach to isolate the actual factor(s) causing blistering. Specifically, there are several questions the potter can ask to isolate glaze blistering.
If the clay body contains high levels of iron-bearing clays or iron oxide, it can be more reactive to extreme reduction in the glaze firing which can cause glaze blistering.
Statistically, whiting, calcium carbonate (CaC[O.sub.3]) is one of the leading causes of glaze blistering. Wollastonite, calcium silicate (CaO.Si[O.sub.2]) which dissolves mon readily in the molten glaze, can be substituted with an adjustment to the silica content of the glaze.
Blistering dactylitis caused by group B streptococci.
Staphylococcal blistering dactylitis: report of two patients.
Blistering distal dactylitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus.
Many women are apprehensive about vaginal delivery because of the possibility of genital blistering and scarring and neonatal blistering, but caesarean section is not a straight-forward alternative [6, 7].
The majority of reported patients have undergone vaginal deliveries, which some authors believe should be the first choice [10] despite a theoretical risk of vaginal mucosal blistering [6].
Given the fact that our patient had extensive bullae and blistering of her skin when she was born vaginally and the fact that her infant sustained similar lesions after being delivered by cesarean section, it seems prudent that pregnant individuals with known ADDEB may deliver vaginally and/or via cesarean section with the thought that the neonate's skin is very likely to blister.
Finally, blistering observed under the stress of a temperature gradient is known as the cold wall effect.