bloc, parliamentary

bloc, parliamentary

[Fr.,=block], group of legislators formed to support special interests. A bloc may form because of a specific issue and dissolve when that issue has been resolved, or it may have a more permanent character, based on a more general interest. It is usually more tightly knit and aggressive than a coalition. The bloc has been a common device in legislatures made up of many parties, where it has tended to create two loose groups of "left" and "right." In nominally bipartisan legislatures, such as those of the United States, blocs are smaller groups and are usually organized to promote a specific economic or social interest or policy as, for example, the farm bloc. The late 20th cent. saw the development of bloc voting by groups of states in the General Assembly of the United Nations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking on emerging from his meeting with Maronite Patriarch Cardinal Bechara Butros al-Rahi in Bkirki this evening, Geagea said, "There are no hidden matters from anyone, and the work of each party, bloc, parliamentary or ministerial bloc is known to all...If we know how to vote in the elections next May, we can make a big difference in the country!" "Explicitly speaking, if we do not vote on this basis, then our complaining will continue for another four years till the next elections," he added.
BEIRUT: Parliament is expected Friday to ratify with an overwhelming majority the new draft electoral law passed by the Cabinet two days earlier, overriding sharp criticism and reservations by some blocs, and even a no-vote by the Kataeb bloc, parliamentary sources said Thursday.