block encryption

block encryption

[′bläk en′krip·shən]
(communications)
The use of a block cipher, usually employing the data encryption standard (DES), in which each 64-bit block of data is enciphered or deciphered separately, and every bit in a given output block depends on every bit in its respective input block and on every bit in the key, but on no other bits. Also known as electronic codebook mode (ECB).
References in periodicals archive ?
Recognized to be the unique 256-bit block encryption algorithm that possesses security levels and processing abilities comparable to AES - BestCrypt's default option - the Camellia cipher can easily be selected when creating a new container.
The specification called as symmetric algorithm (same key for encryption and decryption) using block encryption (see block cipher) of 128 bits in size, associate key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, as a smallest.
A block encryption method registered as United States Department of Commerce Federal Information Processing Standard FIPS PUB197.
In [28], an 8-layer CA is used in block encryption scheme, the scheme is observed to possess better confusion and diffusion properties when compared with AES, and is more efficient than AES.
This is the most standard block encryption algorithm today, as indicated in FIPS PUB 197.
Fridrich [8] demonstrated the construction of a symmetric block encryption technique based on two-dimensional standard baker map.
When using block encryption, each block in a stream is read and then encrypted with the symmetric key.
MARS: MARS had by far the highest latency, as well as the highest ratio of latency to block encryption time.
Taking a message and encrypting all parts of it with a single key is called block encryption.
Camellia is a next-generation 128-bit block encryption algorithm jointly developed by Mitsubishi Electric and NTT, and supports three key sizes: 128, 192 and 256 bits.
The Advanced Encryption Standard is a 128 bit fixed size block encryption.