block encryption

block encryption

[′bläk en′krip·shən]
(communications)
The use of a block cipher, usually employing the data encryption standard (DES), in which each 64-bit block of data is enciphered or deciphered separately, and every bit in a given output block depends on every bit in its respective input block and on every bit in the key, but on no other bits. Also known as electronic codebook mode (ECB).
References in periodicals archive ?
Recognized to be the unique 256-bit block encryption algorithm that possesses security levels and processing abilities comparable to AES - BestCrypt's default option - the Camellia cipher can easily be selected when creating a new container.
A new mode of operation for block encryption called plaintext feedback XORing (PFX) is presented in [18].
The specification called as symmetric algorithm (same key for encryption and decryption) using block encryption (see block cipher) of 128 bits in size, associate key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, as a smallest.
A block encryption method registered as United States Department of Commerce Federal Information Processing Standard FIPS PUB197.
[11] for block encryption. In addition, the concept of Reversible cellular automata (RCA) has also been discussed by Xia et al.
In this paper we will propose a novel and practical quantum block encryption algorithm based on a quantum shift register.
Therefore, EPPA can be considered as a block encryption algorithm operating on these groups of bits with an unvarying transformation that is specified by a symmetric key.
If a new cipher key ([K.sub.in]) is received, the round key computation mechanism is activated for the first counter block encryption. Simultaneously, the round keys ([K.sub.r]) are cached in their corresponding registers pointed by the address generator.
This is the most standard block encryption algorithm today, as indicated in FIPS PUB 197.