block-structured

block-structured

(language)
Any programming language in which sections of source code contained within pairs of matching delimiters such as "{" and "}" (e.g. in C) or "begin" and "end" (e.g. Algol) are executed as a single unit. A block of code may be the body of a subroutine or function, or it may be controlled by conditional execution (if statement) or repeated execution (while statement, for statement, etc.).

In all but the most primitive block structured languages a variable's scope can be limited to the block in which it is declared.

Block-structured languages support structured programming where each block can be written without detailed knowledge of the inner workings of other blocks, thus allowing a top-down design approach.

See also abstract data type, module.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Rust website "Rust is a curly-brace, block-structured expression language.
The software automatically produced a block-structured mesh, and process parameters were defined along with material properties and conditions.
A SAN storage device is a block-structured storage device, serving blocks to a file server.
The grid module features automatic, unstructured, and block-structured grid generation.
It is a problem that has continued to plague block-structured languages ever since.
Fortran-77 should be retained as the last, ANSI/ISO Standard dialect, (3) and its deficiencies should be remedied by selection of an established block-structured language (probably ADA, possible Algol-68) as an alternative to Fortran-8x.
The only technically rational way of advancing the art of scientific and engineering programming is to abandon Fortran in favor of a modern, block-structured language such as Algol-68 or ADA.
Hunter's central objection to the proposed Fortran standard is that it is not a modern block-structured language.