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block

2. a casing housing one or more freely rotating pulleys
3. Pathol
a. interference in the normal physiological functioning of an organ or part
b. See heart block
c. See nerve block
4. Psychol a short interruption of perceptual or thought processes
5. Computing a group of words treated as a unit of data on a tape, disk, etc
6. Athletics short for starting block
7. Cricket a mark made near the popping crease by a batsman to indicate his position in relation to the wicket

Block

A large piece of stone, taken from the quarry to the mill for sawing and further working.

Block

 

in engineering:

(1) A unit of a mechanism in the form of a wheel with a groove around its circumference over which a cable or chain is drawn. It is used to change the direction of a tractive force and to obtain a force or velocity advantage; more rarely, to transfer a torque. Depending on their function, blocks are known as guide, balance, runner, and driving (for imparting rotary motion to a shaft) pulleys. In order to achieve a large force or velocity advantage, a lifting mechanism made up of a combination of blocks (a block and tackle) is used.

(2) A subassembly of a machine, consisting of several identical parts, such as a block of cylinders in an internal combustion engine or the spindle block in a multiple-spindle machine.

(3) A stone (concrete or ceramic) of large size (appreciably larger than a brick) used in the construction of buildings and for road surfacing.

N. IA. NIBERG

block

[bläk]
(computer science)
A group of information units (such as records, words, characters, or digits) that are transported or considered as a single unit by virtue of their being stored in successive storage locations; for example, a group of logical records constituting a physical record.
The section of a computer memory or storage device that stores such a group of information units. Also known as storage block.
To combine two or more information units into a single unit.
A contiguous group of text characters that is marked for moving, copying, saving, deletion, or some other word-processing operation.
(design engineering)
A metal or wood case enclosing one or more pulleys; has a hook with which it can be attached to an object.
(mining engineering)
A division of a mine, usually bounded by workings but sometimes by survey lines or other arbitrary limits.
In quarrying, a large portion of rock that is removed from the quarry as a solid mass for further processing at a mill.
(petroleum engineering)
The subdivision of a sea area for the licensing of oil and gas exploration and production rights.
(statistics)
In experimental design, a homogeneous aggregation of items under observation, such as a group of contiguous plots of land or all animals in a litter.

block

block, 6
1. A masonry unit; a concrete block.
2. (Brit.) A walling unit which exceeds in length, width, or height the dimensions specified for a brick.
3. A solid piece of wood or other material.
4. A plank or timber which serves as bridging between joists or the like.
5. In quarrying, the large piece of stone, generally squared, that is taken from the quarry to the mill for sawing, slabbing, and further working.
6. A mechanical

block

1. <unit> A unit of data or memory, often, but not exclusively, on a magnetic disk or magnetic tape.

Compare record, sector.

block

(1) A group of disk or tape records that is stored and transferred as a single unit. On a CD, a block consists of 98 frames of 33 bytes for a total of 3,234 bytes, or 1/75th of a second. See block level.

(2) A group of bits or bytes that is transmitted or processed as a single unit.

(3) A group of text characters that has been marked for moving, copying, saving or other operation.

(4) A rectangular group of pixels that are processed as a unit.

(5) A group of program statements that are treated as a unit based on the results of a comparison.
References in periodicals archive ?
Holly wrote: "Always take my @ ProteinWorld Carb Blockers Before a Cheat meal, contain natural ingredients and stop any unused sugars being used as fat #ad".
The researchers were curious about whether lowering stress with beta blockers would improve outcomes in patients treated with immunotherapies.
While the ads are now part of the stream to evade ad blockers, Facebook is required to include certain elements for its human users, like privacy controls and text that makes it clear you're looking at an ad.
In our study, none of the 60 patients on amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, gave any history of spontaneous bleeding into the skin presenting as purpura or petechiae or bleeding of the gums.
Coventry Trading Standards are currently running a project where residents who are repeatedly harassed by nuisance callers have call blockers fitted.
Cost may also influence medication selection (in general generic beta blockers and diuretics are cheaper than calcium channel blockers and ARBs).
St James's is Ireland's top bed blocker blackspot with delayed discharge patients occupying 100 beds.
Medical management therapies including alpha-blockers, calcium channel blockers, corticosteroids, and phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors have all been described.
It has been popularized as an effective carb blocker and a great fat burner.
Furthermore, nebivolol and telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, decreased the left ventricular mass to a similar degree [24].
Of the 610 men who had hypertension or were being treated with medication for hypertension, 15 percent were taking a beta blocker alone, 18 percent were taking a beta blocker plus one or more other medications, and the remaining participants were taking other blood pressure medications.
There are three main ways defensive linemen can beat a pass block: run around the blocker (primarily the outside rusher); "bull rush," which is a quick explosive charge into the blocker, attempting to catch or put him off balance and driving him back, collapsing the pocket; and a "spin move," which can be risky as the defensive lineman turns his back to the football.